Burnett Street Supportive Housing in Maple Ridge


Providing safe and affordable housing with supports

In response to the urgent need for more supportive housing in Maple Ridge, BC Housing will be developing 51 units of supportive housing at 11749 Burnett Street for people living at the Anita Place camp and experiencing homelessness in the community.

Supportive housing is a self-contained home with supports provided on-site, to ensure people can achieve and maintain housing stability. Supports include outreach workers, wellness checks, life skills training, employment assistance, and referral to community services and support groups. Residents are connected to counselling, as well as health, mental health, and addiction recovery


Providing safe and affordable housing with supports

In response to the urgent need for more supportive housing in Maple Ridge, BC Housing will be developing 51 units of supportive housing at 11749 Burnett Street for people living at the Anita Place camp and experiencing homelessness in the community.

Supportive housing is a self-contained home with supports provided on-site, to ensure people can achieve and maintain housing stability. Supports include outreach workers, wellness checks, life skills training, employment assistance, and referral to community services and support groups. Residents are connected to counselling, as well as health, mental health, and addiction recovery services.Rendering of what Burnett Street will look like

One of the key factors in making supportive housing a success is proximity to amenities and services as well as accessibility to transit. People experiencing homelessness are already a part of our community; we want to help them find safe and stable housing in the community.

Coast Mental Health

Coast Mental Health will be the building operator, providing 24-hour support to residents. Applicants will go through a thorough assessment process to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports.

BC Housing and Coast Mental Health will lead the resident selection process, in collaboration with local service providers.

Fraser Health

Coast Mental Health will also work collaboratively with Fraser Health to ensure residents have access to the care they need both at the Burnett site and through community-based care services that encourage connections with local general physicians, residential treatment programs, drug and alcohol counselling, as well as referrals and assessments for other allied health services.

Province-wide response to homelessness

In October 2018, BC Housing opened 53 units of temporary supportive housing at the Royal Crescent site 22534, 22548 and 24556 Royal Crescent.

The Table below a list of total homeless units per capita as of April 1, 2019. It is important to remember, however, that housing for those experiencing homelessness is not allocated on a per-capita basis, but rather is built in response to need. The provincial government is responding based on the need in communities around the province, whether that is building 24 units in Smithers, or more than 700 in Vancouver.


Significant Investments in new supportive housing by the Province

The Province is making significant investments in providing supportive housing for people experiencing homelessness in communities throughout B.C., including through the Supportive Housing Fund and the Rapid Response to Homelessness program. The following link includes the number of supportive housing projects and units in communities that are built or underway through investments by the current government: https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2019MAH0048-000449

Modular Supportive Housing Outcomes

In September 2018, BC Housing conducted a staff survey and tenant survey at Reiderman Residence in the Vancover community of Marpole. Across a range of indicators, the quality of life has improved for many Reiderman residents.

Overall Well-being:

The majority of survey respondents (88%) reported improvements in their overall well-being.

Employment, Income, and Education:

Staff reported that seven residents in the building had found employment. In addition, several residents had begun accessing educational opportunities through Vancouver Community College and WorkBC.

In the resident survey, 33% of respondents reported better access to employment opportunities since their move, while 40% reported better access to education.

Satisfaction with Housing and Supports:

Outcome: Improved Health for Residents

“Seeing people stabilize. (…) Just seeing some tenants in clean clothes, taking care of themselves a bit more. Getting connected with doctors, pharmacies and ensuring their needs are met.” -Reiderman staff member

Staff reported that improved health has been a positive outcome for many residents at Reiderman. Residents have access to healthy food through a grocery program and a daily breakfast provided by the Community Builders Association. For many, being able to sleep somewhere quiet in a comfortable bed has led to improvements. One staff member noted that personal hygiene has improved for many residents, as they now have their own showers and easy access to laundry facilities.

Outcome: Community Connections

Reiderman staff indicated that the relationship with the wider community has improved over time, and they now have some neighbours dropping off donations, including Kitchen on a Mission, a student-led non-profit, that drops off fresh bread on a regular basis.

Sixty-five percent (65%) of survey respondents strongly agreed that they have experienced positive interactions with the surrounding community,

What's Next?

Join us for one of eight small group discussions during May. These sessions will be a facilitated discussion and our partners at Fraser Health and Coast Mental Health will be taking part to answer your questions. Please click here to register.


We welcome your questions about this project.

All questions will be responded to within 24-48 hours during BC Housing business hours, Monday to Friday 8:30 am – 4:30 pm.

Important note: To protect your own privacy, please do not include any identifying information such as your name or address.


Please submit your question below:

  • If the Maple Ridge council already voted against this type of shelter on Burnett Street, why would the Provincial government believes they can trump their decision and proceed anyway? Isn't the City paying for the added policing, bylaw and emergency services as a result of this decision by the Province?

    MR Dad asked about 1 month ago

    Burnett Street will not be a shelter – it will be temporary homes with 24/7 supports. The Province is moving ahead with the temporary housing to meet an immediate need in the community that would otherwise result in people remaining on the street, in shelters, or in the tent city. Nothing will change until people have a home and can begin to move forward with their lives.

    We will continue to work with the City on a full spectrum of new affordable housing, including finding an agreed upon location for permanent supportive housing. We are working with the City on a Made-in-Maple-Ridge model based on what we are hearing in the community.

  • Why is BC Housing committed to making the Burnett Street Location "low barrier"? As this location is 650M from an elementary school and a high school wouldn't housing for low-income families or, single parents be better suited to this location?

    MR Dad asked about 1 month ago

    The Province has been opening supportive housing buildings in communities across BC for over ten years and we’ve seen how effective this type of housing can be in helping people address their issues, for some those include mental health and substance use issues. In the seven months that Royal Crescent has been open, we have seen residents access health services, enroll in addiction treatment programs, and find employment working for local companies. To date four people have transitioned into independent housing.

    The Burnett Street temporary housing – like all other supportive housing buildings – will have both on-site and community-based kinds of support services. The new temporary modular will be staffed 24/7 with supports from Coast Mental Health. These support services – which include access to health services – will be tailored to each individual based on what they need. Residents will be able to access a variety of health supports, such as the Intensive Case Management team, nurses, mental health workers and psychiatric services.

    The immediate need in the community is housing for people experiencing or at risk of homelessness. Some of the tenants will be seniors. Supportive housing sites are considered with respect to proximity to community services (commercial and recreational activities); accessibility to transit; adequate lot size; connections to utilities. People experiencing homelessness are already living in the community – the temporary supportive housing on Burnett Street will provide a place for people to have a home and begin to move forward with their lives. We will continue to work with the City of Maple Ridge on a full spectrum of new affordable housing, including finding an agreed upon location for permanent supportive housing.

  • Employers who work with vulnerable children and adults often require their employees to consent (and pass) a vulnerable criminal record check as a condition of employment. Given the proximity of the Burnett location to both a High School and Elementary School, what safeguards are BC Housing implementing (like a criminal record check) to their residents to protect the vulnerable members of our community?

    MR Dad asked about 1 month ago

    Coast Mental Health -- who will be operating Burnett Street -- requires tenants to sign a crime-free addendum as part of their Residential Tenancy Agreement. This is a responsibility to care for their unit, to respect other tenants, and not violate provisions of the addendum.

    Supportive housing tenants have the same rights as any other residential tenant and are not subject to criminal record checks.  However, applicants are thoroughly assessed prior to being offered tenancy, so that we are aware of any legal restrictions. If the housing places a tenant in violation any restrictions, they would not be offered tenancy.


  • According to Dominic Flanigan, BC Housing, homelessness requires "a partnership approach" with municipalities. Why does the evidence suggest this isn't the case, with examples in both Maple Ridge and Nanaimo? How are the residents suppose to trust BC Housing to manage such a sensitive project when the evidence suggests they can't follow through on working with municipalities on the location? https://nanaimonewsnow.com/2018/11/16/bc-housing-seeking-to-join-high-profile-parksville-supportive-housing-lawsuit/

    MR Dad asked about 1 month ago

    Maple Ridge and Nanaimo are examples of how the Province is moving ahead with temporary housing to meet an immediate need in the community that would otherwise result in people remaining on the streets and in tent cities. The need for temporary supportive housing was one of the housing needs identified by the City of Maple Ridge, although it did not propose a workable site. We will continue to work with the City on a full spectrum of new affordable housing, including finding an agreed upon location for permanent supportive housing.

    The Maple Ridge modulars on Royal Crescent are an example of the temporary supportive housing which helps people move forward with their lives that will go through municipal review and approvals for any permanent development.


  • What are the building rules in relation to noise and light bylaws? Will the neighbours to this new building have peace and quiet, or will they hear shouting all hours?

    MRresident2019 asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: We've had concerns that Royal Crescent with some shouting, and so what we've done is actually install some lights, better cameras and just recently hired a security service to actually patrol outside overnight. 

    So we expect that we'll be starting that from day one at Burnett Street so that if there's any disturbance outside after hours, we will either tend to it, the security guard would tend to it. And if necessary we'll get the the RCMP to do that. 

    It's been a concern at Royal Crescent particularly in the last month or two since the Anita Camp closed down. And so we've been trying to to tweak it so that we make sure that not only our tenants have quiet enjoyment of their unit, which every right of a tenant, but that the neighbors do as well. 


  • Will the residents be expected to follow curfews? If these rooms will be passed on to new people over time, do the residents have to follow cleanliness rules? Will they be subject to room searches?

    MRresident2019 asked 2 months ago

    Coast Mental Health: We not have a curfew for our residents. We do suite inspections, probably monthly suite inspections at the start. We wouldn't necessarily do searches unless there was a reason to to do a search of way the right to do a search.

    But really we're looking how well the the unit is taken care of and whether or not people have personal care skills. That's one of the things we'll be looking for how well people manage. You know there are sometimes a tendency for people to hoard things, and so that would be one thing because that could create a safety issue such as a fire hazard or just a trip hazard. So we'll be looking at those as well.

  • I noted that Mr. Flanagan referenced the City of Maple Ridge as being able to answer a question that was asked. Would a rep from the City be able to sit in on any future Q & A sessions?

    Kaye asked 2 months ago

    Dominic Flanigan, BC Housing: [00:33:31] Absolutely.When we're talking about addressing homelessness it's through a partnership approach, and the municipalities have a real strong role to play in that. We would welcome a representative from Maple Ridge to be part of a future panel like this. [00:33:49][18.1]


  • Will every resident be subject to a mental health, physical health, and substance abuse exam upon arrival? Will supports be put in place right away?

    MRresident2019 asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: When we do an intake, we will have some information through the previous application process. BC Housing and our staff will do what we call a Vulnerability Assessment Test which will look at the general vulnerability and needs of each of the residents that are coming in. That gives us some insight, and we'll take a bit of a history of the individual. 

    We will have a nurse in the program to actually look at medical issues and so we can look at what medical issues people may have. And frankly if you've been homeless for a while, you're coming with medical issues. And most of them have been poorly attended to, so that will be a very important issue. We'll also get insight into any mental illness that they may know of, or we think they may have. And so that's where we will work with Fraser Health to make sure that there's a relationship so when people are ready to actually address those issues that they have the resource available. 

    Dominic Flanigan, BC Housing: And I just also want to echo what I think that's a very good question because it speaks to the individualized nature of the support model that Coast Mental Health will be putting in place. Often when you hear about supportive housing, (you hear) that it's a one size fits all. I would argue that actually the housing model that we're talking about is the polar opposite of that. This is a very tailored and targeted approach because it recognizes that there's no single path into homelessness, and so there's no single path out of it as well. Coast provides a very tailored and targeted approach which addresses individual needs. 

    Dan Kipper, Fraser Health:  Could I just add - I'm just picking up on what Darrell was saying around the connection and liaison with Fraser Health - is that some of the individuals in housing need, may even be on our ICM team So that's the Intensive Case Management team, and they they provide support and service to individuals living in the community and potentially in the new housing. And with that team comes a psychiatrist, nurse practitioner, and case manager so there's a lot of additional resources that could be supporting individuals in the monitored housing as well. 



  • Does the mayor and residents who say 'Our City, Our Choice' actually have a choice to decline, hold up or change this housing project?

    UmaSharda asked 2 months ago

    Dominic Flanigan, BC Housing: From a provincial B.C. housing perspective this project is going ahead, and the project is going ahead because the urgent need in the City of Maple Ridge, because there are people as of tonight who are sleeping either in a tent, in a doorway, or in a shelter. And it's really important that those folks are brought inside as quickly as possible. We also want dialogue with the City of Maple Ridge on with the community of Maple Ridge. Homelessness can be a topic which can act as a lightning rod for a range of issues. I understand issues around safety because we all want to feel safe in our community and on the streets where we live. So it's really important that we do have dialogue with the city of Maple Ridge and with the community.

  • Will the building on Burnett be under the Residential Tenancies Act or program agreements?

    Kaye asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health:  Our intention is to have it through the RTA, Residential Tenancy Agreement. 

  • Is this building under residential tenancy

    John Wong asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: Our intention is to have it through the RTA, Residential Tenancy Agreements. Plus the Crime Free Addendum. We do believe there's a good dispute mechanism with the RTA. It's a kind of a grey area in terms of operating, but we find the RTA is something we can work within; tenants know their rights, they also know their responsibilities.

  • When the modular is built and full, will all the other low barrier be closed?

    John Wong asked 2 months ago

    Dominic Flanigan, BC Housing: When the Burnett site opens it's not a case of just opening and closing. I think what we want to do then is see what the need is in Maple Ridge. Supportive housing response in the community is not on a per capita basis, it's based on need in that particular community. So as I said we know that at the moment there's up to 100 people every night in a shelter bed in the City of Maple Ridge. So we'll work closely with the city and our community partners to to monitor the impact. And in 2020, there's going be another homeless count as well. But I think it's really important to say is there's a range of factors we look at when it's past supportive housing. And I also I hear this issue about how Maple Ridge is doing enough and is doing more (than other communities). I think it's important to see what is happening in Maple Ridge across the Metro Vancouver area though as well. Maple Ridge, unfortunately, is not the only community having to address these significant challenges around homelessness. We see it in Langley. We see it in Surrey. We see it throughout the Fraser Valley. So it's important that we respond to homelessness on a community level but also at a regional level across the Metro Vancouver area. 


  • Will there be 24/7 security at this site in addition to minimal staffing? Thank you

    Kpvey asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: We anticipate that there be eight hours of security overnight. So right now it's ten to six in the morning and we'll assess that if that's sufficient. We will have staff on site 24/7 to staff on and will be monitoring issues. We do have a camera system set up, and the cameras not only look in the building but also do the perimeter as well, so if staff see something through their cameras that's of concern, they can actually use the phone the RCMP, or intervene themselves if they feel that's appropriate. So that's what we're starting with ,and we'll see how that works, and we expect it to be fine. 

    Dominic Flanigan, BC Housing: And that's where the community advisory council becomes a really good sounding board for what's going on the community because I was saying on that community advisory council is the RCMP the neighbors the local businesses. So docs are really good sounding board for what's going on on the ground. 



  • If those who reside at Anita Place do not want to move into the Burnette st location, what are your plans to house them?

    MRresident2019 asked 2 months ago

    Dominc Flanagan, BC Housing: Well I think that some of that is a question for the city of Maple Ridge around how they respond if people start to camp out in parks. We're very aware of some of the issues and needs in Maple Ridge, and just to give you an idea from a shelter perspective the mainstream kind of shelter program operated like most people know by the Salvation Army on Lougheed -- that every night has close to 60 people in that shelter. Since the city has taken over the supervision of that site there's a low number of people at the site because there's a registration process and they do not allow any guests at the site. 
    But as people are aware we have also kept the Salvation Army shelter operating, what used to be the mattress store on Lougheed. And over the weekend that had over 35 to 40 people inside on a Saturday and Sunday. So in terms of a shelter bed alone, we're talking about 100 people every night in a shelter bed. So that speaks to some of the issues in need. Of course that's not counting the people who are street homeless. And you know we do share the concerns about camping in parks those kind of issues. That's why we've invested in the City of Maple in outreach teams to engage with people who may be camping in parks or down by the river or by the railway lines. 

  • What qualifications will the staff have that will be on site, such as qualified health care like nurse, counselors or mental health etc.

    Kaye asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: We will have a registered nurse on site. So the seven days a week we're very happy with that we'll have a manager on site but the average worker would be what we call a mental health worker, normally they'll have a degree from a university a university or college, they could have a social work degree, it's quite a collective. We've in Royal Crescent with some of the Aboriginal heritage and we want people who can actually reach out to and support that relationship between the primary worker and the tenant which is really important. So we want folks who have the skills or the ability to do that in an effective way but also work effectively as a team as well. And of course we'll augment their skills with first aid training with crisis intervention skills be able to diffuse situations, plus all our staff would have Naloxone training so that if they had a an emergency that bill to respond to that as well. 

  • Will this project community build be for a diverse population ? Seniors single parents ? And addictions and mental health of course How any apartments will be available to help the current population in Maple Ridge? I am thrilled to s is finally being addressed here, it’s not acceptable to keep the standard we have with people struggling to live, being homeless. Thank you

    Rampantred asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: There'll be no families. These are single units so there wouldn't be any families in there but it could be someone who's 20 it could be someone who's 65 or 70. So to be that kind of range really depends on the needs and the appropriate use of the area. We wanted to cast as broad in that as possible that makes sense.
     
    Naomi Brunemeyer, BC Housing: And right now housing is actually designed to have accessible units on the ground floor. So because there's no elevator in the building it's three stories but the ground floor guys have accessible units and so we'll be able to accommodate people that have mobility challenges. 
    There'll be no families. These are single units so there wouldn't be any families in there but it could be someone who's 20 it could be someone who's 65 or 70. So to be that kind of range really depends on the needs and the appropriate use of the area. We wanted to cast as broad in that as possible that makes sense. 
    Right now housing is actually designed to have accessible units on the ground floor. So because there's no elevator in the building it's three stories but the ground floor guys have accessible units and so we'll be able to accommodate people that have mobility challenges.

  • A few years ago we had a safe place for kids ages 13 to 18 to go when they were thrown out of their homes due to family conflict or other circumstances. The Iron Horse Safe House provided five emergency beds for kids to stay for up to 30 days while they put a plan together or were repatriated with their families. Unfortunately it closed when federal operating funding dried up. It is a critical resource and yet not discussed when we talk about the need for housing. These kids are at great risk of becoming street entrenched if not given someplace safe to go. We recorded approximately 20 kids living rough or couch surfing during the last homeless count. Can this please be addressed in this dialogue?

    Mike Murray asked 3 months ago

    Naomi Brunemeyer, BC Housing: B.C. Housing in partnership with the city of Maple Ridge actually did replace the Iron Horse youth safe house. The house was actually owned by the city of Maple Ridge so while the federal funding dried up the building wasn't actually structurally sound and so we actually had to relocate it. 
    B.C. housing purchased a house renovated it and made it up to licensing standards to allow for youth to live there. So we don't publish the location of it to protect the identity of those children. So there are six youth that are within those ages from 13 to 18 that live there. In addition to that, B.C. housing actually is funding 10 beds on Katzie First Nation so they came in under the Indigenous Housing Fund and the intent of that program is to actually house Indigenous youth that are aging out of care and they're bringing back their members back to the nation lands. That's a very exciting partnership that we're that we're interested in. 
    In addition to that this provincial government has said that housing youth is a priority so under this last federal budget was a provincial budget announcement where we have the supportive housing fund we're looking at various opportunities within communities in the Fraser Valley particularly to look for opportunities to provide youth housing which hasn't been part of our mandate previously.

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: if I could just add if we want to prevent homelessness you have to look at where people come in and a lot of young people are aging out of care and that's a high participation in homelessness. And so we want to stop that. And I think these are really good initiatives. I know in Maple Ridge there are the Community Services Council is developing a boundaries youth support site. Again, hopefully to prevent the wheels from falling off for young people who are you know from 14 to 24. 

  • What is your opinion of mandatory treatment for drug users?

    Tammy asked 2 months ago

    Dan Kipper, Fraser Health: We all have to look at individuals as individuals. And it really is a matter of choice. I think to mandate someone to do something is very difficult. And I think you know certainly I work in the mental health field and under the Mental Health Act we do have an ability if someone is quite ill to make decisions against their will, that’s just the way the act is, but I think to actually force and mandate someone to take the substance use treatment or things like that is very difficult. And I think we really have to respect people's individual's rights and if they choose to live a lifestyle that they've chosen you know that that is really their choice and we can be there to support them when they need it or ask for it. But a lot of times people will you know go into treatment or go into recovery and fall off of that and then come back. So it's really it's quite a cyclical kind of thing. 

    Dr. Ingrid Tyler, Fraser Health: I just think I want to answer that from the perspective of a physician. So as a physician we would be the ones that would sign off on he's orders to take away an individual's right under a circumstance under certain circumstances and it's not something that's done lightly. Generally one might do that if one is posing a risk to themselves or others. And in the context of drug use it would be a very short term risk to basically pink slip somebody and force them to remain in a hospital. It's not done lightly and it's not done routinely and it's something that's highly protected under the law because taking away an individual's rights is not something that you want to be easy. 

    Dan Kipper, Fraser Health: And if I could just add the Mental Health Act doesn't allow you to mandate someone into substance use treatment. So it's just that's just the law. He can't do that. 

    Dominic Flanagan, BC Housing: I think just from the perspective from the person who's homeless game becomes back to the issue is once people are brought inside it always amazes me just by being housed and having their own home and that sense of stability and they have that opportunity. 
    I'm always reminded of this because I was at the Anita place camp about a year or 18 months ago and someone there said it's really hard to make a positive change in your life when you live in a tent. And that's really stayed with me because it is hard to make a positive choice when you just call your tent and your whole day is all about survival. 
    That's where again it speaks to the need for all how housing and having your own home can make a real difference.

  • Would this supportive housing in Maple Ridge take homeless with criminal records? Do homeless after housed ever confess to past crime and how is that dealt with?

    UmaSharda asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: We've had people who've had to deal with their actions and so they've gone to court and they've been and may have been sentenced or have probation. That part of Housing First is actually providing housing and then sorting through those issues. It may be actually part of our recovery plan with individuals that helps them deal with it so that they actually go through the court system and whatever that results in. 

  • For Coast. What about policy on drug dealers etc living there?

    John Wong asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: With the crime free addendum, we don't want criminal activity on the site. So with drug dealers living there that pushes that line, it's one of the issues for eviction if we find someone's causing harm to others in the building. This would be something that we would deal with and if necessary we will look at the eviction process for that. 
    If necessary also bring the RCMP in because it really is a criminal matter -- it's one thing to use, but it’s another to sell. 

    Dominic Flanigan, BC Housing:  Just to add to that is where the strength of the Community Table starts to come into it because through the community coordinated access and assessment table, that's where those issues are often very strongly dealt with. 
    Again I come to the issue that for people who are homeless in Maple Ridge the well-known to a lot of the community partners such as Coast Mental Health and other community partners in Maple Ridge so issues about people dealing are all dealt with at that table. 
    This speaks to the need to have a strong coordinated access and assessment process and making sure it's dealt with in a strong partnership approach about who moves into the building.

  • What would be required for tenants to be evicted? Are lifting or transfers to beds or toilets provided onsite for tenants? Are homeless ever sent to assisted living supportive care facilities?

    UmaSharda asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: They can be, in Coast Mental Health’s experience people may age out of housing if they're older and there are some mental health facilities that provide 24/7 care that are deemed to be assisted living.
    Home support and nursing would provide those assessments and make decisions whether someone needs to be referred to as assisted living so all of those linkages would be in place. 
    What you see increasingly in the Metro Vancouver homeless count is that the homeless population is getting older and so this is why we need this kind of model of supportive housing and a strong partnership with Fraser Health because we are seeing an older population who are being homeless. 

  • There are ppl on the street that have very complex mental problem. What is available in house for them

    John Wong asked 2 months ago

    Dan Kipper, Fraser Health: Part of our work in mental health and substance use will be to provide a liaison worker who could come in and work with a nurse on site there so if there's someone who has been identified as having mental health concerns or mental health issues a Fraser Health nurse can provide part of the assessment along with the Coast Mental Health Nurse. 
    Because of that linkage we have a strong connection to our own community mental health center so it's a fairly tight ability to assess and then provide treatment following. 
    Sometimes it's a matter of getting individual in housing so then some of those assessments can take place. 

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health:  Coast Mental Health would be ability to administer psychiatric medication in the building and that will actually make a big difference for any people who  have a psychotic type of disorder like schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. 


  • If a drug dealer is seen on the property, will the police be called? What about stolen goods, like shopping carts or bikes that the residents initially arrived without? Will the serial number of these bikes be checked with the RCMP for reported theft? Will the shopping carts be returned to the stores they came from?

    MRresident2019 asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: We do encourage the police to tend to issues like that shopping carts but there should be no need for shopping carts. People can have a place to store their clothes.
     
    One of the things you'll see when the residents have been there for a few months is that they look different. First of all to get a meal they'll get two meals a day a breakfast and a dinner that they will have laundry so they'll have clean clothes. They'll have a place to keep clothes so they won't have in a sense have to tote all their belongings in a cart. You’ll actually see quite a difference in people just the way they look after a few months of living in their own suite.

  • I'm wondering why it is necessary to have this housing model in this specific location that is right near homes and multiple schools?

    Andrea asked 2 months ago

    Naomi Brunemeyer, BC Housing: BC Housing purchased that site a few years ago and we bought it intentionally for supportive housing. When we were looking at various factors we look at is the size of the lot whether it's flat or not because a modular solution usually uses a flat site. We look at what the official community's plans are and we actually intentionally want them close to amenities and close to transit so Burnett was actually an ideal location. 

    When you look at those sorts of factors. We want to embed housing within residential communities because we believe that's the best way for people to move forward with their lives is to live in residential settings. In communities such as Maple Ridge there is always going to be a school or a daycare or some sort of other community amenity and so we want our residents to be able to participate fully in society.

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: In Coast Mental Health’s experience over 40 almost all of its facilities are embedded in residential communities, and as we mentioned there are schools and daycares, and by and large there you don't hear a peep. And frankly most people can drive by our facility and not know they're there. 

    Dominic Flanigan, BC Housing: There's a range of reasons why people become homeless. That might be related to structural issues around poverty and may be related to a lack of access to affordable rental housing. It could be a traumatic event. It could be a health need around addictions mental health but it's often it's usually a result of a cumulative impact rather than one single cause that causes a person to become homeless. 

    Some may remember the news stories on the Marpole project in Vancouver which had significant community concerns around 78 units of supportive housing on the streets in Vancouver very close to schools. So far, the housing has worked incredibly well with the high school being very actively involved in the program. 

    Coast Mental Health operates Little Mountain at thirty seventh and Maine and its neighbor is a senior housing project literally ten feet from our modular housing project, and they were very concerned. We met with them before we were meeting with them continually and they recently invited our tenants in for a barbecue. So we hope that the project will work well in the community -- we expect it to. And if there are bumps in the road we'll work it out through our committee advisory process.

  • In relation to the abstinence only model, will those that live in your building and know their triggers be supported? If they know the smell of crystal meth smoke triggers them, will you support them in resisting the drugs the other tenants are doing? They are not "going to a beer hall" like you mentioned before, they are staying in their home trying to not relapse.

    MRresident2019 asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: First of all we with smoke and other things, the new modules are well ventilated so that hopefully there is no ingress from smells from other rooms into the into the hallways or into the common area because it's a smoke-free working environment. And one of the things we would work with every tenant is what their strategies for dealing with whatever is a trigger for them. 

    It’s a sad reality that drugs are just way too available in our community and so one thing in someone's journey of recovery is to figure out “how can I protect myself” and using an example smoking nicotine is a very addictive product, so smokers need to figure out within themselves how to make sure they can manage those urges, whether or not they use a treatment like Nicorette or gum, and making sure they're not in that smoking environment that creates that problem, it’s the same for other products as well.

  • Since this service model does not exclude individuals who are using drugs, will the drug use be limited to inside their units? Is there a plan to keep neighbouring houses and elementary school children safe from exposure to this? Will staff be checking that individuals are not leaving the premises with drugs?

    Andrea asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: [00:34:47] We won't be inspecting people, what they have in their personal property or anything like that. One of the agreements people sign is a tenancy agreement, but also the crime free addendum. So we don't want them to engage in criminal activity in the community. So if that happens that would actually put their tenants here at risk. And for tenant, that's a very powerful lever, a very good motivator, because people like the housing, and want the benefits of that. So we can't say that it won't happen and that people won't go out with drugs, in particular even with marijuana these days because it's legal, and with other drugs as well . But what we try to do is have will have a committee Advisory Committee for Burnett street. 

    We will also have a phone number for the site and the we will publicize that number around the community so if there is something that happens in the neighborhood that someone's worried about and thinks that that has to do with our site, hopefully they can phone us and we can deal with it. 

    And if it is so one of our tenants that we can deal with in terms of a tenancy issue. If it's not then of course it could be an issue for the RCMP. [00:35:54][7.0]

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: The Community Advisory Committee is basically it's exactly what it says. It's a group of community members, and key stakeholders, and crew including Fraser Health, BC Housing, the RCMP, the City of Maple Ridge. We sit down - probably start on a monthly basis - to just see how it's going and what are the issues from the community. And we share what we see, and what we're doing - and so there's there's no surprises and if there are issues we can course correct. For example at Royal Crescent we saw a litter in the streets. So now we have a clean team. We saw some noise, and now we've increased security and lighting and other things so that we can course correct. 

    We've done this for facilities since 2011 in Surrey, and Dunbar, and other communities to make sure we navigate the process of starting a new program in the community very well. Most of the the new advisory committees last two to four years and then they kind of decide "well we don't need to meet anymore because there's nothing going on". We meet at Dunbar, w've been meeting for the last 10 years, but I think it's just because people enjoy meeting. So we continue to meet and talk, and really the committee committee advisory committees segued there into "what could be do to help the tenants and how they move forward in their life. [00:41:27][42.9]



  • What will be done to make sure the residents keep the area clean, such as not leaving needles on the ground? Will this building have sharps boxes on their premise to dispose of needles safely? If needles are handed out, will the residents be held accountable to properly dispose of them?

    MRresident2019 asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: [00:38:05] It's a good question. We had this question with one of our very first meetings at Royal Crescent with the Community Advisory Committee, and we quickly established a five person clean team of residents who policed the neighborhood. So not just the grounds of Royal Crescent, but the the neighborhood. And We've actually expanded the zone that they go around and pick up any garbage, and if they were to see any needles they could actually put them safely into a Sharps container. So this would be what we would bring to Burnett Street to make sure that there's a whole area that are policed by residents, and actually it's a way of encouraging people to be appropriate and to take care of their community. And again our experience with housing for the last 40 some odd years is that people are very proud of their housing, and want to keep it nice because for many it may be the best thing they've lived in memory. [00:38:59][53.3]

    Dr. Ingrid Tyler, Fraser Health: [00:39:03] My experience has been with several housing sites that this clean team model is very effective and that generally there is not a lot of needle litter in the area. Sweeps are done regularly, but I wanted to point out that if anybody does find an inappropriately discarded needle that they're concerned about. 

    Fraser Health does provide a phone number that you can call to have that needle properly disposed of, as well as disposal instructions on online on our Web site also. So there's a number of services that Fraser Health contracts out to make sure that the communities are as clean as possible of any inappropriate needle discards. 

  • Why is BC Housing against an abstinence based temporary housing model for Burnett? People that have completed a recovery program or detox cannot be in an environment with active drug use. The continued success for these individuals requires a drug free living space. Maple Ridge currently has a minimum of 3 places for active drug users to find temporary shelter but nothing for those that are clean.

    Shadow asked 2 months ago

    Dominic Flanigan, BC Housing: [00:42:02] So thank you for the question. B.C. Housing does provide a range and fund abstinence-based programming. What we have at the moment in Maple Ridge is an urgent need to address the homeless challenges in this moment. And that's why we are providing the type of housing model. It's not housing just four walls and a roof, and nothing happening. This is the type of housing where people can, and do, get clean either through a community based program, or (by going) away to a place like Kinghaven or a support recovery program. We provide a range of options, and we're also sitting down with Maple Ridge and saying what does a made-in-Maple Ridge model look like in terms of a recovery and abstinence based model. What's that look like for this community as well in the the mid and long term. [00:43:19]




  • If you do not recommenced individuals using drugs privately, where do you suggest they use? In the main area of the housing? On the street?

    MRresident2019 asked 2 months ago

    Dr. Ingrid Tyler, Fraser Health: [00:36:09] Actually using drugs alone behind a closed door by yourself, is a significant risk factor for overdose. And as we know we're also dealing with an opioid overdose crisis in this province. So I need to strongly suggest to anybody that if you do use opioids, or if you know of a family member, or loved one,or a friend or anyone who uses opioids - please do not encourage them to use alone - because that's aknown risk factor for death in opioid overdose. We strongly encourage people to let somebody who cares about them know that they're going to use. So if an overdose occurs - which can considered to be highly probable with the current poison drug supply - that somebody can come help call 911 or administer nalooxone if an overdose occurs. [00:37:00][51.2]


  • What is the time line from being built to doors open for residents. Rosina

    Rampantred asked 2 months ago

    Site preparation work will begin in late April with occupancy anticipated for mid to late October 2019.

  • How many homeless people go back to being homeless and go on to recovery/a permanent home in a 5 year long temporary supportive modular housing that is like the one planned to be built for Maple Ridge?

    UmaSharda asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: [00:26:25] In our experience - and we've been in housing for a long time - once people are adequately housed, they don't go back. So evictions happen. And actually from our experience with the At HOme/Chez Soi program, which we operated with 100 people in a scattered model, was that some people were evicted, but we actually wrehoused them... nd sometimes it took three evictions before someone settled in a place and moved forward. So evictions are rare, but it does happen - an I would say well over 90 percent are stably housed. [00:27:00][34.8]

    Dominic Flanigan, BC Housing: [00:27:03] I also want to say that I think it's important to realize that B.C. Housing has been providing supportive housing for well over 10 years, and nd one of the things we closely monitor is housing stability. So that's an outcome that we track, our housing stability figures are very high. But when people do leave supportive housing, if they do say, lose that housing for whatever reason - one of the things that we've really started also is building a rapid rehousing model. So we do do our best to try and follow people if they do lose their housing. But one of the key indicators that we do measure is housing stability. [00:27:48][44.5]

    Dan Kipper, Fraser Health: [00:27:49] And I think one of the benefits of having support services on-site and in-reach services, let's say for mental health and substance use, is that we can provide some consistent treatment. And so an individual may continue to get well which provides them with stable housing, versus being homeless and not being able to follow up with appointments or not able to be following any treatment regime. So so really this this model of housing with the wraparound supports is really beneficial. [00:28:17][27.6]


  • Will those who came from other municipalities be directed to second stage housing there?

    MRresident2019 asked 2 months ago

    Dominic Flanigan, BC Housing: [00:25:34] When we opened up Royal Crescent all those people who moved into Royal Crescent were longtime Maple Ridge (residents). What we see in Maple Ridge is what we see in many of the communities, that there's a homeless population who are long term (living) there. So the priority for this housing will be for people who are homeless, and have been long term homeless in Maple Ridge. [00:25:58][23.7]


  • How is a treatment center different then the supportive modular housing the province is building? Could you speak to..do those living there have a safe injection site? Are residents allowed to use illegal drugs on site whether indoors or on outside within the property limits of the modular housing? How many people are on the case load for any health care professional who is providing services at the modular housing?

    UmaSharda asked 2 months ago

    Dominic Flanigan, BC Housing: [00:22:06] It is important that this is seen as both housing, and treatment, and health combined all in one spot. And housing is the platform for those support services, for that access into community based services. So that would include treatment. This housing does not exclude people who are using drugs, and we feel that's very important because if you exclude people who are using drugs then they remain on the street. And the significant evidence to show now, that the longer people remain on the street homeless, they (begin to) have very complex health needs. And besides the human cost, it's a significant cost for First Responders, for the E.R. system, etc. [00:22:57][51.6]

    Dominic Flanigan, BC Housing: [00:22:59] So again it's about the combination of housing, in which you provide access to both treatment and and connection to keep the community based programs. [00:23:09][10.0]

    Dan Kipper, Fraser Health: [00:23:10] And could I just add so to differentiate treatment . Really an individual may go into one of our substance use treatment facilities so Maple Ridge Treatment Center, Kinghaven, some of our support recovery homes where there's actually designed programs to support them in their recovery. I think the modular housing is more housing, but they would have supports on-site and there could be programming on-site. So it's really a differentiation of treatment and housing. And Is this going to be a safe injection site? No it's not. [00:23:44][33.6]

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: [00:23:58] Our expectation is that (if people use drugs) they use it inside the building, and not outside in the public. We will have Sharps containers, safe way for people to do that, but we want to encourage that people do not do that in the community. That they actually do it in a safe way, so that if there is an overdose that people can respond and hopefully respond appropriately to that. And again as mentioned, if they're motivated to move into treatment then we would look at detox and certainly look at the treatment stream, as soon as possible. [00:24:29][30.5]

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: [00:24:45] For Coast staff I say we probably have a caseload of eight OK for residents and plus we'll have a nurse overseeing all of them. 

    [00:24:56] And a manager for the program that will oversee all the all the residents. But each key worker would have eight to ten people on their portfolio. [00:25:06][9.9]




  • What is the expected time each resident will be living in the building? How will you ensure those who are waiting for housing are not on the streets on a wait list? Will the original residents stay for long periods of time?

    MRresident2019 asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: [00:19:13] I'll answer that. My experience is that with these up that housing is that you measure. Measured in a matter of years. And so I expect the minimum stay would be a year for most people. And then we'll after these sort of things out they'll move forward. It may be faster, it could be six months for some who really have a goal and we're able to find a way to find housing for them, but it may be two or three years too.


     We don't artificially put a time limit on this, it actually creates a crisis for someone. We were a partner in the At Home Chez Soi program, which is a national homelessness program and it was a two year operational plan. People were worried one year before they knew there the program's going to end. They were worried a year out, and it caused a crisis. 

    So we would rather not do that, we'd rather actually have a plan for where the next step is. One of our early conversations (will be) " you're here now, where do you want to be, and what do we need to do to help you get to that spot." [00:20:09][48.3]

  • We are veery excited to hear about the new housing coming into our community and believe that housing is the start to healing. We are wondering what supports, besides health supports, will be offered to the new tenants? Thank you

    Lisa asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health: 

    What would we do again through this planning process with folks, (if fins out ) are they interested in volunteering, etc? We'll have a community garden there (for) people(who) are interested in gardening. We'll be looking at what actually brings them joy in their life and try to tap into that. So rather than push people to do things that they don't want to do, find what they love and actually encourage that and then build on strength. 

    Because everyone no matter whatever is going on their life they'll have a whole array of strengths, and finding ways to enable that and move the people forward on that. It could be  whatever, e a walking group or hiking group - all those types of things are really useful to build a full life. 

    Because really what we're hoping to do is allow people to move back into being full citizens in their community. And part of that is actually enjoying the resources. So if that's going to the community center, or if that's getting involved with clubs in the community all that would be wonderful. But we won't know until we actually have those conversations.


  • What is the list of the supports for metal health and substance abuse issues that are readily available to those staying at your building?

    MRresident2019 asked 2 months ago

    Darrell Burnham, Coast Mental Health:Coast Mental Health works with clients on a case management point of view. So we have a key worker working with each resident and they'll do an assessment and self-assessment for their clients too. We use a model called Recovery STAR and so people would determine which area recovery they're needing. If there's a need for a mental health assessment or if its primary health assessments that's where we would work with the mental health team, local Fraser Health team, or Fraser Health Public Health to actually do an assessment of what that person will need. And that may be part of that recovery plan; to work on mental health goals or primary health goals, addiction goals, or employment, or actually getting involved in volunteer activities. Anything like that would be part of that planning process for an individual with addictions or with mental illness. We also anticipate that we'll be able to manage medication support if people need that. So if people need daily medication for either the primary health issue or a mental health issue we'll be able to manage that, and we certainly do that already at Royal Crescent, and we expect that we'll be doing that Burnett Street. 

    Dan Kipper, Fraser Health: We'll also be working quite closely with Coast and have our own Outreach Support Worker providing liaison support to the Coast staff, both in terms of doing mental health assessments as well as referring to other resources in the community. We also have a nurse practitioner who will be going in each week doing primary care, assessment and treatment in the on-site clinic. So we will be doing some in-reach as well as encouraging individuals to access service out in the community as well. 



  • When are the in person sessions for Maple Ridge scheduled? Thank you

    Kpvey asked 2 months ago

    The in-person sessions will be taking place in May. We are finalizing dates now and the details will be posted on our website within the next week, so do keep on checking on our Web site. 

  • Thank you for offering an online information session, where I can watch from the comfort and security of my own home and for allowing citizens to ask questions. I am please the province is stepping in to build the modular's on Burnett to facilitate the peaceful decampment of Anita Place. My question is that once both modular sites are up and running, will the province and BC Housing focus on enhancing the support services in our community as well as treatment options, second stage & transitional housing as the modular residents progress towards better health? Thank you, in advance, for your response.

    lalina asked 2 months ago

    We will continue to work with the City of Maple Ridge on a full spectrum of new affordable housing, including finding an agreed upon location for permanent supportive housing. The advantage of modular housing is that it can be moved to a new location, once a permanent home has been identified. For example, many of the buildings already completed in Vancouver are on leased land and some will be moved to new locations in future.

    Support services, including treatment options, are the responsibility of Fraser Health. BC Housing will continue to work on expanding the housing available for people in need in communities across the province.

  • My understanding is you are only funding low barrier supportive housing for the street-entrenched homeless at this time. Is this correct? Are there any other options? What happens if someone wants to go to detox? Is there any 2nd stage housing for them to go to and do you fund it?

    Dee asked 2 months ago

    People who apply to live here would need to meet eligibility requirements around income, homelessness and required supports and programming. Residents would be low-income individuals over the age of 19 who live in the community, have a history of homelessness and who need additional support services to maintain housing. They would be provided support to assist with their successful tenancy, including daily meal services. The new housing will prioritize people from the Anita Place camp. Other units will go to people throughout Maple Ridge who are homeless or living in shelters. People who experience homelessness are as varied as any other neighbour. They may be seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. All residents in supportive housing have made a choice to work towards living a healthy, stable life.

    If a resident of supportive housing, like any community member, wants to join a detox program, they will apply through Fraser Health. BC Housing does not fund treatment programs – that is the responsibility of the Ministry of Health.


  • I am in support of the Burnett St project. Absolutely necessary and well located. However I am concerned about it being “temporary “. This allows for quick construction. But what is the lifespan of the modular units? Will there be a permanent solution in a timely fashion?

    LinKin asked 2 months ago

    Thank you for your support. We will continue to work with the City of Maple Ridge on a full spectrum of new affordable housing, including finding an agreed upon location for permanent supportive housing. The advantage of modular housing is that it can be moved to a new location, once a permanent home has been identified. For example, many of the buildings already completed in Vancouver are on leased land and some will be moved to new locations in future. 

  • Please answer directly to the several people that have asked the specific question as to whether there will be 24/7 security outside the facility. A simple yes or no with no politicians shuffle please.

    Ken asked 2 months ago

    We can confirm that the site will have security hired for the initial launch to ensure operations run smoothly.


  • I have a family member who is currently homeless in Maple Ridge due to mental illness. This person does not use substances and has tried to stay in the local shelters but the environment isn’t good for him due to the amount of use happening there. How do you plan to help an individual in this type of situation where they don’t want to reside in a residence with drug use? It seems to me like addicts are being placed as the only priority if you’re implementing a low barrier situation. What about those with mental illness, what about the seniors, what about the single moms? We currently have 3 low barriers in our community. I would personally like to see this one being used for the other groups of homeless people in our society so there’s a place for EVERYONE. I’m not saying addicts don’t need help and housing, they absolutely do but we’ve now opened 3 places for addicts and I think it’s time to open one for the other democratic that at least consists of curfews and a drug free zone. People who don’t use substances will not live in these situations that you are proposing. I can tell you that not from guessing or looking at skewed data but from actual experiences of trying to get help for a substance-free homeless man who deserves a chance to get well. Please tell me what plans you have in place for these people. Thanks

    Careforall asked 2 months ago

    People with addictions will not have priority for this supportive housing. People who experience homelessness are as varied as any other neighbour. They may be seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, or people who are working through mental health concerns. We recognize that not all homeless people have substance use issues. But being homeless is traumatic and may result in dependence to drugs and alcohol, and mental health challenges.

    Supportive housing provides an independent studio home, as with other rental housing there are no curfews. Residents have their own personal space as opposed to shelters which are shared with other people.  Each resident will require different support. All residents receive individualized case planning to further develop life and social skills such as employment planning and managing the transition to independence and recovery, as well as programming space to facilitate training and food preparation. Other services include outreach workers, wellness checks, connection and referral to community services and support groups. During the resident selection process, each person will be considered based on the support services needed to help the residents remain healthy and housed.

    Supportive housing is based on the Housing First model – proven to help many people find and maintain stable homes, improve their quality of life, and reduce their use of health and social services in the long term. Supportive housing gives people access to the health and counselling services they need to address mental health and substance use challenges as well as housing, in order to more successfully break the cycle of homelessness. This improvement on the old treatment-only approach is supported by research and real-world results, both here and around the world, including an extensive four-year study across Canada.


  • The Ministry's primary reason for imposing the new modular housing without consent of City Council was to put an immediate end to the Anita Place tent city. Is the Ministry willing to concede that the tent city issue will not be resolved by this modular housing as many occupants of tent city have already made it clear that they will refuse this housing? If so, what harm would there be in going back to the table with the City of Maple Ridge and working towards a real solution to the fentanyl crisis in our community - a solution that is supported by the citizens of Maple Ridge?

    Tammy asked 3 months ago

    In a crisis situation, every day counts. Given the urgency of the situation, the Province cannot wait any longer before starting on the additional supportive housing that people need.

    We will continue to work with the City of Maple Ridge on a full spectrum of new affordable housing, including finding an agreed upon location for permanent supportive housing. The advantage of modular housing is that it can be moved to a new location, once a permanent home has been identified. Many of the buildings already completed in Vancouver are on leased land and some will be moved to new locations in future.

    The priority for the Burnett Street housing is people staying at the Anita Place camp, people who have set up smaller camps in other locations throughout Maple Ridge and people staying in local shelters - however - if there are vacancies, all applications will be considered. Not all of the campers will go into the new housing, some will go into shelter spaces, and some people in the shelters will apply for units at the new housing.

  • Will there be security 24/7 around the perimeter? (besides the two staff inside)

    Gail Ingalls asked 3 months ago

    BC Housing builds safe communities inside and outside of supportive housing through:

    • Selecting operators with experience: Coast Mental Health has over 40 years experience in providing housing and services to the community, including operating Maple Ridge Modulars, on Royal Crescent, since October 2018.
    • Resident Mix: Selecting residents based on the ability of staff to provide the right level of support to all residents.
    • Agreements: All new residents will pay rent and sign an agreement as per the Residential Tenancy Act.
    • Staffing: Staff will be on-site 24 hours a day, seven days a week. During the day, due to programming activities, there may be more than two staff on-site.
    • Property maintenance: Regular sweeps of property and immediate area to ensure cleanliness.
    • Design features: Optimized lighting, security cameras, fob access only, staffed reception, contained outdoor space for smoking and dog walking.
    Both sites will have security hired for the initial launch to ensure operations run smoothly.

  • Will Anita Tent City be removed?

    Gail Ingalls asked 3 months ago

    While BC Housing is not responsible for enforcement of bylaws and laws, we are open to working with the City of Maple Ridge to ensure the closure of the camp and to ensure that the remaining people at the camp have an offer of housing.

  • If occupants of Anita Place who are offered housing refuse housing and insist on setting up tents, can they then be charged for trespassing? Many say they will continue to live on the streets. How will you respond if this happens?

    Tammy asked 3 months ago

    We understand that perimeter fencing will be installed and a no trespassing bylaw will be enforced at the Anita Place site, however, BC Housing is not responsible for enforcement of bylaws and laws. This question can be better answered by the City of Maple Ridge and local RCMP.


  • First Thank you BC Housing for actually attempting to help this issue. Can you maybe tell me what RRH means in the graph? I hope we have a safe injection site added to the complex, and a whole team of supports similar to the Tranquille Site in Kamloops, although I do understand that is a purpose built facility and not a temp one. I really like the supports being given there. I do not fear the location in the least

    Eric OConnor asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your words of support and the opportunity to clarify some information. RRH is the Rapid Response to Housing program, which is building over 2,000 modular supportive housing units across B.C. These RRH units are already making a difference for people in 14 communities including Chilliwack, Abbotsford, Surrey and Maple Ridge.

    The building on Burnett will not have a safe injection site. We take a harm reduction approach, which means staff is available to support any residents who are in various phases of substance use. Statistics show that many people who die from overdoses do so when they are alone, and so Coast will be working closely to ensure the safety of residents who are active substance users. As part of the program, residents make their own choices in regard to lifestyle and are supported in efforts to work on their health and well-being.

    We can confirm that a whole range of supports will be available to the residents at Burnett  including access to community based health programs.  Whether supportive housing is permanent or temporary, the residents will have supports available. Supports could include outreach workers, wellness checks, life skills training, employment assistance, connection and referral to community services and support groups.


  • Will there be security 24/7 around the perimeter? This location is very close to an elementary school, a high school and seniors’ centre. Will there be a curfew? No open drug use (high barrier?!) Someone to clean up drug paraphernalia every morning before kids start walking to school? It is very concerning that our children and seniors will have to be afraid of walking around...what will be done to guarantee THEIR safety?

    Karlavica asked 3 months ago

    The safety of our future residents, staff and the surrounding community is a priority for all partners. These permanent supportive homes will have two staff available on site 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to ensure that residents are supported and that any concerns are addressed in the timely manner.

    We have seen numerous supportive housing buildings open successfully across the province, including in urban areas, bringing benefits to both the community and the residents of the new housing. 


  • Since you've decided to build the shelter on the same street as an elementary school, how are you going to protect the children of Golden Ears Elementary from being exposed to drug paraphernalia?

    Davidhubbins asked 3 months ago

    We are building homes with supports, rather than a shelter. It’s important to understand that these will be homes for people, they will have their own space and communal space both inside and outside of the building. They will have supports provided on-site by staff 24/7. We have seen numerous supportive housing buildings open successfully across the province, bringing benefits to both the community and the residents of the new housing. 

    The safety of our future residents, staff and the surrounding community is a priority for all partners. These permanent supportive homes will have two staff available on site 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to ensure that residents are supported and that any concerns are addressed in the timely manner. 

  • If Anita’s Place residences do not want these “homes” will you be trucking in other homeless people from other cities to fill the space?

    Concerned resident asked 3 months ago

    The plan for 51 units is based on need in the community – we know that there are approximately 40 to 50 people who have been living at the camp and/or accessing the emergency shelter, in addition to those accessing the permanent shelter. Not all of the campers will go into the new housing, some will go into shelter spaces, and some people in the shelters will apply for units at the new housing. The need in Maple Ridge is clear. 

  • Is there any tracking of statistics for the modulars? How many from the existing modular have gone on to rehab? How do you fill empty slots? How many have been evicted from the current modular in maple ridge ? Why were they evicted? What are the conduct rules to stay at the modulars? how will the residents be selected? Do you have to be homeless to get a spot?

    Dswc asked 3 months ago

    Royal Crescent Supportive Housing has been operating since October 2018. BC Housing can confirm that the tenants have seen an improvement in their lives through access to safe and stable housing, meals and supports on a daily basis, including connection to community-based health services including life skills training, treatment, employment assistance, etc  Coast Mental Health (CMH) tenants are also clients, so their personal information and progress is kept confidential.  

    One person has been evicted from Royal Crescent. CMH tenants have a responsibility under the Residential Tenancy Legislation to care for their unit, to respect other tenants and staff and not violate provisions of the crime-free addendum to the RTA. An eviction may occur if a tenant is violent and poses a risk to other tenants and staff, but this rarely happens because the goal of CMH is to stabilize and support clients through their journey to recovery. Staff do their best to find alternative housing options for a tenant if they are evicted, but this only occurs when the tenant refuses over time to address their behaviors.

    The new housing will be available to people who are homeless in Maple Ridge, 19 years or older and meet eligibility requirements regarding income, homelessness, required supports and programming. Priority will be given to eligible people residing at the Anita Place camp in downtown Maple Ridge.

    BC Housing will work with the operator, Coast Mental Health, and other local service providers to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports live in the housing. The offers of tenancy are made following meetings held by BC Housing’s coordinated access team of agencies to assess applicants for suitability. Every potential resident is considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services. We want all residents to be successful.

    Residents in supportive housing have made a choice to work towards living a healthy, stable life. All new residents will pay rent and sign an agreement as per the Residential Tenancy Act. A community advisory committee will be developed to support the successful integration of the new building and residents into the community, with representation from BC Housing, Fraser Health, local businesses, the immediate neighbourhood and community organizations.


  • What if the people at tent city don’t want to Move in? Unfortunately it has been posted all over the media that some of them will not go to supporting housing...what then? Is there a guarantee that No one from other places will be shipped into Maple Ridge like it happened with the first set of modular housing?

    Karlavica asked 3 months ago

    The new housing will prioritize people from the Anita Place camp in order to close the camp. Other units will go to people throughout Maple Ridge who are homeless or living in shelters.


  • How will you provide and maintain security to the surrounding community, which is often victimized by crime, associated with poverty, drug addiction, prostitution, and mental health issues among homeless population?

    Copperlynx asked 3 months ago

    BC Housing and Coast Mental Health are committed to being good neighbours. Both staff and residents will be committed to keeping the property and neighborhood maintained with a daily clean-up, just as any other resident in the neighborhood.  Supportive housing that we develop across the province provides a safe community both inside and outside. 

    Supportive housing is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week, by an experienced non-profit operator. Neighbours will have a direct contact for the building if any issues arise. 

    Also, a Community Advisory Committee will support the successful integration of the new building and residents into the community, with representation from BC Housing, Fraser Health, RCMP, local businesses, community organizations and community members.


  • You identify this project as supportive housing but a significant number of citizens identifying as homeless would prefer low or zero barrier housing - free house/roof with no rules or social constructs. How will this project assure the citizens of Maple Ridge that those that will be given a space here will be required to follow rules/use the services provided. What will the repricussuons be for those that decide the rules do not apply to them? For those that may break the law/engage in criminal activity?

    kakerman asked 3 months ago

    Residents in supportive housing have made a choice to work towards living a healthy, stable life.All new residents will pay rent and sign an agreement as per the Residential Tenancy Act. A community advisory committee will be developed to support the successful integration of the new building and residents into the community, with representation from BC Housing, Fraser Health, local businesses, community organizations and community members.

  • What order of priority will be used to fill these units? For example, vulnerable and low income seniors FIRST??

    kakerman asked 3 months ago

    There has been an increasing amount of seniors becoming homeless and we agree that these vulnerable individuals need homes. In the 2017 Homeless Count in Metro Vancouver, seniors aged 55 and over represented 21% of the homeless population compared to 18% in 2014.

    That's why we are also committed to working with the city on the design of new permanent affordable seniors’ housing to be built at the Burnett site in the future.

    For this temporary supportive housing at Burnett Street, every potential resident, including seniors, will be considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services they need. 


  • How do you plan to qualify/assess who has a need for this type of housing and associated services? Will you be denying housing and support services to individuals who have been proven to be openly against wanting to live in this type of residence? (ie: those that choose to live and identify as homeless by choice).

    kakerman asked 3 months ago

    BC Housing will work with the operator, Coast Mental Health, and other local service providers to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports live in the housing. The offers of tenancy are made following meetings held by BC Housing’s coordinated access team of agencies to assess applicants for suitability. Every potential resident is considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services. We want all residents to be successful.