Dawson Creek Supportive Housing

Illustration of supportive housing building

This drawing is an approximation of what we intend to construct on the site and is subject to change.

BC Housing, the City of Dawson Creek and the South Peace Community Resources Society (SPCRS) are working together to provide 30 new homes with supports for people experiencing or at-risk of homelessness. The proposed site of this project is 1024, 1028, 1032, and 1036 104 Avenue. The City of Dawson Creek is donating the land and a rezoning application has been submitted.

BC Housing and SPCRS will work with local service providers to tenant the building with the right mix of residents to match the supports.

Community Engagement

BC Housing hosted a virtual information session on Wednesday, September 2, 2020 to provide more information about the plan for the new supportive housing, answer questions and collect community feedback about how to ensure the success of supportive housing in the community. All input provided will be shared with the City of Dawson Creek as part of the rezoning application process.

Partners

BC Housing would fund the construction and the operation of the housing. The City of Dawson Creek is donating the land for this project. SPCRS, a non-profit organization with over 45 years of experience providing services in the region, would oversee the day-to-day management of the building. Staff would be onsite 24/7 and provide a range of support services including daily meals, access to health care services, and connection to community services and support groups.

The design is an apartment style modular building with a mix of 30 units for individuals and couples. Construction is estimated to start September 2020 and complete in early 2021.


This drawing is an approximation of what we intend to construct on the site and is subject to change.

BC Housing, the City of Dawson Creek and the South Peace Community Resources Society (SPCRS) are working together to provide 30 new homes with supports for people experiencing or at-risk of homelessness. The proposed site of this project is 1024, 1028, 1032, and 1036 104 Avenue. The City of Dawson Creek is donating the land and a rezoning application has been submitted.

BC Housing and SPCRS will work with local service providers to tenant the building with the right mix of residents to match the supports.

Community Engagement

BC Housing hosted a virtual information session on Wednesday, September 2, 2020 to provide more information about the plan for the new supportive housing, answer questions and collect community feedback about how to ensure the success of supportive housing in the community. All input provided will be shared with the City of Dawson Creek as part of the rezoning application process.

Partners

BC Housing would fund the construction and the operation of the housing. The City of Dawson Creek is donating the land for this project. SPCRS, a non-profit organization with over 45 years of experience providing services in the region, would oversee the day-to-day management of the building. Staff would be onsite 24/7 and provide a range of support services including daily meals, access to health care services, and connection to community services and support groups.

The design is an apartment style modular building with a mix of 30 units for individuals and couples. Construction is estimated to start September 2020 and complete in early 2021.


Thank you for your interest in this project. Answers will be posted the week of Monday, October 26, 2020.

Have a question or comment? Please write below.

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  • will there be drug testing before and during your stay?

    homeonewer 104 asked about 2 months ago

    This new building would be permanent supportive housing. There is no set timeline on how long people reside in the building. South Peace Community Resources Society would work with each resident to understand their needs and goals and provide the support they need to have successful tenancies.  

    BC Housing’s supportive housing buildings are operated based on the widely recognized and proven Housing First model. Residents of supportive housing live independently and will make their own lifestyle choices but will be encouraged to consider healthier options. They will have access to the on-site and community support services they need.


    BC Housing does not discriminate against a person based on their level of need. Residents will be assessed to ensure they are matched with the right level of support services they need to remain housed and live a more healthy, stable life.  We take a harm reduction approach, which means staff is available to support any residents who are in various phases of substance use. When residents are ready to make a change, staff on site will connect them with the appropriate support services.

  • I have some concerns that I need specific clarification on in regards to your supportive housing that is being constructed in Dawson Creek. This will pose a significant impact on business's and residents who live in or near this neighbourhood. This supportive housing unit will be located within 25 metres of current residences. I have worked alongside individuals who face several different kinds of barriers including employment, mental health and homelessness. I understand there is a definite need for a facility such as this. But I have some questions and I will be writing letters to the city, South Peace Community Resources Society and BC Housing in regards to the shelter being built. One of my questions is about the donation of the land to BC Housing. We have heard time and time again that the city doesn't have it in the budget to even keep up to the snow removal in winter months and keep our roads and sidewalks safe and accessible. So my question to is how can the city afford to be giving away parcels of land when I can't even get my street plowed? If the people accessing this service are at risk won't they be receiving income assistance which will then be profiting BC housing? If BC housing is making a profit why do they need the land donated? my next question is what sort of supports are going to be in place to protect the residents and business owners who are directly affected the increase in crime and the drastically increasing amount of theft and vandalism? Now I'm speaking from first hand experience having caught people attempting to steal my personal property and quite frankly I am pissed off! What other city lots are available for this and does it really need to be located next to a daycare? I am also wanting to know what is the eligibility to access this service. DO they pre-screen the people seeking this support for a criminal record? In your study it shows a widely inaccurate study based on calls from the police six years ago. Perhaps you get some accurate numbers and compare it year by year. I want to take the opportunity and state that I do feel that this would be impactful for our community and there are certainly people who need this service I just feel it is unfair to the property owners and taxpayers who will be directly effected by this and I'm certain I'm not the only one who feels this way. I look forward to everyones feedback. Thank you.

    Curtis asked about 2 months ago

    People often confuse supportive housing for a shelter.  Shelters are an important first step. The primary focus of shelters is to bring people indoors to get warm, access food and get the support they need to move into housing – like this property.  


    Unlike the shelter programs that take people on a drop in/short term stay basis, supportive housing provides long-term rental units for people experiencing or at risk of homelessness and who need support with varying health and personal needs. Supportive housing provides a home with access to on-site supports to ensure people maintain housing stability. Residents have their own self-contained studio apartment under a program agreement and participate in an individualized case plan. Residents access the services provided by the non-profit housing operator and are connected to primary health care, mental health and/or substance use services.


    BC Housing, the City of Dawson Creek, and South Peace Community Resources Society (SPCRS) all recognize the need for supportive housing in Dawson Creek. BC Housing works with non-profit housing operators and funds the construction and cost of operating the housing. When the land is made available without cost, this reduces the costs, creating a net savings among multiple layers of government for taxpayers. Housing people who are experiencing homelessness saves money too, by reducing strain on services. BC Housing does not operate housing for profit.


    BC Housing and SPCRS work together to choose residents for this development. Each person who wishes to live here will participate in a thorough assessment of their eligibility and effort is made to find a good mix of people who will thrive in this form of housing. Each resident is considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match. Residents are referred out or services brought in to support individuals with the services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services. 


    People who experience homelessness are as varied as any other neighbour. They may be seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. All residents in supportive housing have made a choice to work towards living a healthy, stable life.

  • Why was this area chosen and is it already decided that this is where it is going to be built? I live in very close proximity to the lots in question. We already have a huge problem with property theft and trespassers as is, which the police seem to do little about. Is there not another location that is away from existing residential neighborhoods, day cares and schools that would be more appropriate? I know that not all the planned residents will have bad intentions in mind but it only takes a few to cause trouble in our neighborhood. I've read your case study of the other properties and the only data you used were police calls before and after which is not the best indicator of neighborhood approval and on top of that the study is from six years ago. It would be nice to see an updated case study that included the neighbors opinions and whether property values went up or down after the buildings were built. I am probably just wasting my time though because from reading your case study it seems that you just pushed through and built the properties regardless of what the neighbors thought.

    Concerned neighbor asked about 2 months ago

    BC Housing worked in collaboration with the City of Dawson Creek to locate a suitable property for supportive housing, and the sites are owned by the City. 


    Supportive housing locations are determined based on services, amenities and availability of property. The suitability of supportive housing sites is considered with respect to proximity to community services (health services, commercial and recreational activities); accessibility to transit; adequate lot size; connections to utilities; and compatible land use policies. 


    This report from January 2020 reviews the findings from 13 case study sites across British Columbia to draw conclusions about the impacts of non-market housing on surrounding property values: https://www.bchousing.org/publications/Property-Values-Case-Study-Overview-Report.pdf 


    Community Benefits of Supportive Housing reports on resident outcomes 6 months after living in supportive housing. For the most up-to-date research, you can visit BC Housing’s Research Centre: https://www.bchousing.org/research-centre/library/community-acceptance&sortType=sortByDate 


  • Is this housing available to disabled persons?

    katmar asked about 2 months ago

    BC Housing standard is that 5% of the units are designed to be wheelchair accessible. The balance of the units are built with walk in showers and have sufficient area to for movement to accommodate those who may use a walking aid. However, this facility is primarily built for people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, some of whom have disabilities, which may include issues with mobility.


    People who apply to live here will meet eligibility requirements around income, homelessness and required supports and programming. Residents will be low-income individuals over the age of 19 who are experiencing homelessness or are at risk of homelessness in the community and who need additional support services to maintain housing.

  • Are you really going to build a homeless shelter right beside a day care centre and children's playground?

    incredulous asked 2 months ago

    The supportive housing at 104 Avenue in Dawson Creek will be permanent studio homes – not a homeless shelter. Shelters provide access to a temporary bed or mat. The primary focus for shelters is to bring people indoors to get warm, access food and get the support they need to move into housing. Supportive housing provides a home as well as 24/7 on-site support services. Residents will apply to live in the building and go through a thorough assessment process, sign a program agreement (similar to a tenancy agreement), and pay rent for their units.

    The building will be operated by South Peace Community Resources Society (SPCRS), and they would work with each resident to understand their needs and goals and provide the support they need to have successful tenancies. Supports could include outreach workers, life skills training, employment assistance, connection and referral to community services and support groups.

    Schools, daycares and parks are located within all communities. Many supportive housing sites for people experiencing homelessness across the province have been operating in their communities and near schools for 10+ years with no issues and with support from the community.

    Many people who are experiencing homelessness have been living in isolation or have lost their connection to community. One of the goals of supportive housing is to help residents engage with their surrounding community and build a sense of belonging.

  • Is this housing only going to be available for those who find themselves on the street due to unforeseen circumstances or will it be available for those who have no means to support themselves or are in circumstances that prevent them from living/existing as they have for previous years? Will there be long, short and temporary housing available? What age range will the housing be provided? We have a number of young people (15-18 yrs) living on the street or couch surfing, will they be able to access? Is there consideration of seasonal access, such as summer vrs winter? I ask because I know that many of the homeless in our town use the dense forested park near our home to set up "camp" in the warmer months. We have no means to shelter people during long periods of extreme cold in this community, is this housing going to be available for those who choose the "homeless life-style" during these temporary conditions?

    Elaine asked 3 months ago

    This permanent supportive housing would be available for people over the age of 19 who are experiencing homelessness or who are at risk of homelessness and who need additional support services to maintain housing. Priority would be given to people who already live in the Dawson Creek area. 

    BC Housing’s goal is to provide programs and services that seek to break the cycle of homelessness. This would be permanent supportive housing - there is no set timeline. Supportive housing provides a home as well as 24/7 on-site support services. People who live in supportive housing apply and go through a thorough assessment process, and they pay rent.

    When basic needs are met (warm housing, daily meals and hygiene), we see many people access support services, stabilize their lives, achieve employment and move into independent housing. 

    South Peace Community Resources Society would work with each resident to understand their needs and goals and provide the support they need to have successful tenancies. We recognize that there are diverse housing needs in the community, including youth, and we will continue to work together with our partners on finding housing solutions.