Let's Talk Housing in Hope

BC Housing is proposing to build 52 new homes with supports that will be operated by the Hope and Area Transition Society (HATS). The property at 660/670 Old Hope Princeton Way is adjacent to the House of Hope, a permanent 20-bed shelter that HATS has operated since Fall 2018. BC Housing will be leading a rezoning application to the District of Hope for the supportive housing; this application will also include 650 Old Hope Princeton Way, the location of the shelter that HATS currently operates.

Service providers estimate there are more than 50 people experiencing homelessness in the area, not

BC Housing is proposing to build 52 new homes with supports that will be operated by the Hope and Area Transition Society (HATS). The property at 660/670 Old Hope Princeton Way is adjacent to the House of Hope, a permanent 20-bed shelter that HATS has operated since Fall 2018. BC Housing will be leading a rezoning application to the District of Hope for the supportive housing; this application will also include 650 Old Hope Princeton Way, the location of the shelter that HATS currently operates.

Service providers estimate there are more than 50 people experiencing homelessness in the area, not counting those already accessing the local shelter. There is currently no supportive housing in Hope, and the Hope shelter is operating at capacity. To address this urgent need, BC Housing has identified an opportunity to create 52 new homes with 24/7 supports for people experiencing or at risk of homelessness in Hope.

Housing with Support

Supportive housing is a self-contained studio home with supports provided on-site, to ensure people can achieve and maintain housing stability. The housing would be available to people who are homeless in the surrounding area and those currently living in House of Hope. BC Housing and HATS would lead the resident selection process, in collaboration with local service providers. All new residents would pay rent, sign a program agreement and good neighbour agreement.

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  • I’ll like to know how to apply for housing in bc if I’m Not residing In another province

    Rebecca Asked 4 months ago

    Applicants for this supportive housing project or any other subsidized housing through BC Housing must permanently reside in British Columbia when applying.

  • Why are there no units for families?! And who decides the criteria for acceptance? Everyone has a right to housing in a province that doesn’t hold legal title to unceded Indigenous territory.

    Miranda Asked 5 months ago

    Homes with supports for people experiencing or at risk of homelessness are being built because there is a need in the community. The building would accommodate couples in individual units. There are other projects in proposal and in development in Hope, such as new affordable rental housing for Indigenous families in partnership with Mamele'awt Qweesome Housing Society. We agree that more is needed and BC Housing continues to work with municipalities across the province on developing new housing options.

    People who apply to live here would need to meet eligibility requirements around income, homelessness and required supports and programming. Residents would be low-income individuals over the age of 19 who live in the community, have a history of homelessness or are at risk of homelessness and who need additional support services to maintain housing. Hope and area residents would have priority. BC Housing and HATS would collaborate with local service providers on a thoughtful and thorough assessment process to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports live in the housing.  Every potential resident would be considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services. 

  • Do the rental units include utilities?

    Rosalyn Asked 7 months ago

    Yes, rent for supportive housing units, such as those proposed for 660/670 Old Hope Princeton Way,includes utilities, and two meals a day. Dishes, utensils and cooking equipment would also be provided. 

  • I am very much in favour of this facility going forward. Unfortunately many citizens of Hope do not understand homelessness and choose instead to judge those in need based on incorrect assumptions and stereotypes. It is unfortunate but I hope those that understand scientific method will prevail.

    AaronSecond Asked 8 months ago

    hank you for your support of this proposal.

    As you are aware, those who are experiencing homelessness are not a homogenous group and have had different pathways into homelessness – they may be seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. That’s why supportive housing tailors its response to clients, to help them maintain their housing.

    We are hopeful that as we continue to work with those in the community who need our support, the rest of the residents of Hope will see that this proposal is a good thing.

    BC Housing has research to draw from that supports our experience that supportive housing is an attribute to a community. See the Document Library for further information.

    • Research completed in 2018/19 of 13 B.C. supportive housing sites – Community Benefits of Supportive Housing – found that:
      • property values immediately surrounding 10 of the sites either kept pace or surpassed surrounding municipal trends, while the values for the other three sites were not notably different compared to municipal trends.
      • Out of 152 residents, after six months living at seven of the supportive housing buildings:
        • 94% of supportive housing residents remained housed
        • 84% reported improved overall well-being
        • 54% reported improved access to employment opportunities
        • 39% report improvement in addictions issues.
    • 2018 studies in B.C. showed that every dollar invested in supportive housing creates four to five dollars in social and/or economic value. Government realizes about half of the savings due to decreased use of services, while neighbourhoods benefit from improved well-being and increased local spending.
    • Supportive housing is also less costly for taxpayers than doing nothing.
      • On average, a person experiencing homelessness with addictions and/or mental illness used $55,000 per year in health care and/or corrections services, compared to $37,000 for a person in supportive housing.
      • A 2019 B.C. study showed that supportive housing residents, when compared to emergency shelter clients, were 64% less likely than emergency shelter clients to use ambulance services and experienced 50% shorter hospital stays.

  • Let's compare the low barrier facility proposed for Hope with what has been implemented in Maple Ridge. The facilities in MR have negatively impacted the surrounding neighborhoods- this CANNOT be denied. What has HATS and BC Housing learned from the MŔ facilities insofar as what will be done better here in Hope to ensure the community will NOT be subjected to the same issues as those that have arisen in MR from the low barrier facilities there? There are many reasons for homelessness. Supportive housing for those presenting physical barriers, young adults aged out of care, those escaping spousal abuses, seniors who have lost their housing, and those who have completed detox, treatment and rehabilitation should NOT be housed in or near a facility that will also house addicts. Further, those in active addiction should be given the choice of detox, treatment and rehab BEFORE the provision of housing- for treatment to be effective, the desire to abandon the lifestyle must come from the addict and despite what we are being told, housing first is not effective encouragement for this to take place. What plans are there to increase treatment facilities since we are told of the inadequate number of these facilities in our province?

    CindyK Asked 9 months ago

    Maple Ridge cannot be compared to the proposal for 660/670 Old Hope Princeton Way. This proposal is for permanent purpose-built housing with supports for Hope.

    The Maple Ridge community was experiencing concerns prior to the temporary supportive housing being built. This temporary supportive housing was a response to an emergency situation with many people living in camps. What BC Housing has learned is that if a community does not address its need for housing for supports at the earliest opportunity, it will find itself in a crisis situation sooner than later. There is a cost to doing nothing. We have also learned that community advisory committees allow partners to work together with the community to address any concerns that arise through collaboration.

    You express concern for those presenting physical barriers, young adults aged out of care, those escaping spousal abuses, seniors who have lost their housing, and those who have completed detox, treatment and rehabilitation - the reality is that many of  those individuals are also people who are using substances, and that many people experiencing homelessness are using substances as a way to cope with being homeless. Supportive housing can and will mitigate many seniors, vulnerable women and young adults from becoming homeless.

    BC Housing’s supportive housing buildings are operated based on the widely recognized and evidence-based Housing First model. Residents at these sites, and all other supportive housing buildings that BC Housing is affiliated with, are permitted to make their own choices in regard to lifestyle. This includes the decision to abstain or use drugs/alcohol in the privacy of their homes. If they choose to use, the operators will work with each tenant ensure they use safely. When residents are ready to make a change, staff on site will be able to support the residents by connecting them with the appropriate Fraser Health support services required to address their issues.

    The target population for the Housing First approach under the Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) is individuals who are chronically and episodically homeless. HPS has defined these populations as follows:

    • Chronically homeless refers to individuals, often with disabling conditions (e.g. chronic physical or mental illness, substance abuse problems), who are currently homeless and have been homeless for six months or more in the past year (i.e., have spent more than 180 cumulative nights in a shelter or place not fit for human habitation);
    • Episodically homeless refers to individuals, often with disabling conditions, who are currently homeless and have experienced three or more episodes of homelessness in the past year (of note, episodes are defined as periods when a person would be in a shelter or place not fit for human habitation, and after at least 30 days, would be back in the shelter or inhabitable location)

    The definitions of chronically and episodically homeless individuals include all sub-populations, such as Veterans and/or Aboriginals. The definitions also include individuals exiting institutions (e.g. child welfare system, mental health facilities, hospitals, etc) who have a history of chronic and episodic homelessness and cannot identify a fixed address upon their release.

    Fraser Health will continue to provide a range of inpatient and outpatient services to the community such as chronic disease management, mental health and substance use, and home and community care. New mental health funding is the responsibility of the Ministry of Mental Health and Substance Use.


  • Definitely support this. We desperately need affordable housing in Hope for people living on or on the verge of the street. Despite what some of the naysayers seem to think this isn't a problem that will just go away if we ignore it long enough.

    M Asked 10 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • We are against this supportive housing proposed for Hope. Hope is a beautiful little town where many seniors live. The Senior Independent Living home is just across the road from this proposed building. Will their residents be in a safe environment when this facility is operating? Hope doesn’t have the support services that are needed to make this a safe facility.

    Milly Asked 10 months ago

    Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

    Those who are experiencing homelessness are not a homogenous group and have had different pathways into homelessness – they may be seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. That’s why supportive housing tailors its response to clients, to help them maintain their housing.

    Residents would sign a Program Agreement and will be expected to abide by it. The Program Agreement will address expectations about appropriate and respectful behavior especially as it relates to the health and safety of themselves and others. Staff will work with residents and the neighbours to foster good neighbourhood relations.  Residents are expected to:

    • Treat neighbours and community with consideration;
    • Not make excessive noise or cause unnecessary disturbances;
    • Ensure security doors are closed properly and not let any unknown persons into the building;
    • Put garbage in the appropriate bins;
    • Clean up after pets;
    • Not smoke in the common areas, including the front entrance.

    HATS may end an agreement at any time if a resident is:

    • Engaging or behaving in a manner which is abusive and/or a threat to the mental or physical health or safety of anyone in the building/community;
    • Significantly disrupting the quiet enjoyment of other participants and/or neighbours; and
    • Engaging in willful vandalism or damage to the building or property.

    If HATS ends an agreement and evicts a resident, they would look into housing and shelter options, so that people will not become homeless again.

    Studies have shown that when housed, individuals spend more of their money in the community, therefore contributing financially to local businesses. In addition, those who find housing as a result of proposals like ours find increased personal happiness, healthier living conditions, an ability to engage in employment, reduced substance abuse and an increase in safety and social connections. You can find more information about the social return on investment in housing here: https://letstalkhousingbc.ca/11538/documents/21319


  • There is mention of supports. that can be accessed for these residents . Does Hope have these supports systems? Who pays for those services for them? Are they mandatory for those that need them ? Are they to be enforced? How and by who? Seems fraser health, our medical system and our policing are already out stretched. Where are these extra services to come from?

    Nad Asked 10 months ago

    The supports referenced are on-site and can include outreach workers, wellness checks, life skills training, employment assistance, connection and referral to community services and support groups. Residents would also have access to counselling, as well as health, mental health and addiction recovery services through Fraser Health.

    BC Housing and HATS would collaborate with local service providers on a thoughtful and thorough assessment process with local service providers to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports live in the housing.  Every potential resident would be considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services.

    Residents would sign a Program Agreement and will be expected to abide by it. The Program Agreement will address expectations about appropriate and respectful behavior especially as it relates to the health and safety of themselves and others. Staff will work with residents and the neighbours to foster good neighbourhood relations. 

    Case management plans would be developed with all residents and it will be expected that all residents will work toward achieving the goals that they have set out for themselves. When a client/resident is not working toward their goals, conversation would happen, bringing to their attention the requirements of the program agreement and that their case management plan is part of their program agreement and they are jeopardizing their residency.  All residents would be assigned to a case manager and weekly meetings with their case manager would be conducted. 

  • A few questions for clarification. At the meeting, I was told that residents would pay $350 a month for rent. One of your replies to questions here stated that they would pay $375 -- which is correct? Will they have to pay for utilities -- electricity, etc ...? Also are the meals included in this or will they pay for the meals and if so, how much would the cost be to the resident? With the figure of $710 welfare per month that leaves them with approximately $300 per month for their expenses -- food, toiletries (soap, toothpaste, deodorant, hygiene products), medicine, toilet paper, kleenex, paper towels, clothing, household necessities such as laundry detergent, dish soap, cleaning supplies, pet food and other products for pets, etc ... and cigarettes/drugs/alcohol if they are so inclined. If phone service or other electronic costs (cable tv) are not included, how is it feasible that they will be able to manage financially? Also, it would be of great interest to many to see an actual program agreement which you mentioned in many communications, that all residents must sign and abide by. Will you be posting this and any other documentation requiring to be signed, somewhere on your site or will one be provided to Council as a matter of public record? If the latter, when will this be submitted and if so, will this form the documentation when your organization applies for the zoning change? another question with regard to the following from your handout -- "Residents will be low-income individuals over the age of 19 who live in the community, have a history of homelessness and who need additional support services to maintain housing. Hope and area residents will have priority. " It would be helpful if you would define: low income individuals, additional support services and Hope and area residents -- especially the term 'resident'. Next, referring to this from your communications material, "...with supports provided on-site, to ensure people can achieve and maintain housing stability. Supports include outreach workers, wellness checks, life skills training, employment assistance, connection and referral to community services and support groups." "Residents have access to counselling, as well as health, mental health, and addiction recovery services through Fraser Health." Please define 'on-site' and 'access to'. You state that Fraser Health will provide these services, has there been a written commitment from Fraser Health, and if so, how is it possible that an already overburdened system in Hope, is not just willing but capable of fulfilling this? How will this affect the services to others in Hope? Where and when will the poster boards be available on line? I was told at the meeting that they would probably be available on line. In closing, assuming that some of the residents will be successful, where will they move to? Hope already has an acute housing shortage for people who work and can live independently so how will they make that transition and to where? Or rather, will this, by default, become a permanent housing situation? I appreciate your having this forum for people to ask questions and find answers. I hope that this will enable the people of Hope to make an informed decision about this project and its value to our community.

    hope homework Asked 9 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback. It will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

    The rent for a studio apartment including two meals a day and utilities, is $375 a month. Dishes, utensils, cooking equipment would be provided with the apartment. Residents would pay for their necessities through the income that they have access to, some people experiencing homelessness have full-time or part-time employment. Others, once they have stable housing, can work toward seeking employment options, whether part or full-time employment. 

    Program agreements are developed by an operator prior to a building opening. We can provide a sample program agreement - please visit the Document Library on this page for reference - but please note that agreements are adapted to meet community need.

    BC Housing does have a glossary of terms that might be useful when reading through some of our materials. It can be found here: https://www.bchousing.org/glossary

    Low income: Household earnings in relation to housing. BC Housing uses different ways to describe low income, depending on the program or service it relates to.

    Additional support and services refer to those people and services residents will have access to help maintain their housing. It can include outreach workers, wellness checks, life skills training, employment assistance, and referral to community services and support groups. Residents also have access to counselling, as well as health, mental health and addiction recovery services.

    Hope and area residents means people who reside in Hope and when necessary, up the Fraser Canyon and into Boston Bar, through this coverage has been limited in the past.

    The poster boards from the meeting are available now at the following link:

    https://letstalkhousingbc.ca/11538/documents/21682

    On-site is exactly what it sounds like – some of the supports will be available to residents in the building. Same with access to! The goal is to make it as easy as possible for residents to connect with the supports they need to be successful in maintaining their housing.

    Fraser Health will continue to provide a range of inpatient and outpatient services to the community such as chronic disease management, mental health and substance use, and home and community care. The people who would apply for the proposed housing are already living in Hope – these are not new people.

    People experiencing homelessness are not a homogenous group and have had different pathways into homelessness – they may be seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. That’s why supportive housing tailors its response to clients, to help them maintain their housing.

    More is needed. There are other projects in proposal and in development in Hope, such as new affordable rental housing for Indigenous families in partnership with Mamele'awt Qweesome Housing Society. BC Housing continues to work with municipalities across the province on developing new housing options.

    The goal is that this proposal becomes the crucial first step for those in your community to find a more permanent solution to the housing crisis they find themselves in. 

  • I have serious issues with this project coming to hope, i don't trust HATS as we have seen before how well the thunderbird project was run. It brought a boat load of homeless to our town. i see this as another attractant. I also see that there are some serious security issues for the residents, for the workers and for the local neighbors. No where in this project its listed that a criminal record check is going to be done prior to them entering and living in this building. so that being said. How is the staff going to feel safe and secure, how are the people who are actually seeking to get true help not fall victim to the predatory capabilities of those who deal drugs and do drugs when one person in one room is trying to be clean and the other is allowed to do drugs? I have not seen anywhere on any of the paperwork that drugs and alcohol WON'T be permitted on the premises. What safeguards are in place for your workers? Also, Is this another "low barrier" housing project or is this a NO TOLERANCE. building like i've mentioned a million times over. People that are on drugs who do not wish to stop doing drugs should NOT live in a building like this. This building is being build very close to an old age home where your planning on bringing 52 homeless / street people to come live. How can you protect them from the folks that have these major mental health issues? Are you willing to be responsible for the increase crime in the neighborhood? Will you be held accountable if anyone openly attacks people in the area because you have decided to harbor criminals? I know that people need a place to live and a chance at a sense of home and security. but you need to triage this with the true homeless who want help and the ones who want a shelter over their heads to continue their criminal activity in this town. This is a very very fine line and this is where you need to take a responsible approach and make it a real contract that gives them accountability and an actual place where they can get help.

    nathalie Asked 9 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback. It will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

    We agree that the Thunderbird is not an ideal housing situation for people experiencing homelessness. The Thunderbird is a not supportive housing – as is proposed at 660/670 Old Hope Princeton Way – it is a temporary housing unit, without supports, where people are precariously housed, with monthly risk of eviction. Homes with supports is the next step for people who are experiencing homelessness in shelter or on the street, and those who are at risk for homelessness so that they can remain in Hope, which is what this project is aiming to create.

    Those who are experiencing homelessness are not a homogenous group and have had different pathways into homelessness – they may be seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. That’s why supportive housing tailors its response to clients, to help them maintain their housing.

    Residents would sign a Program Agreement and will be expected to abide by it. The Program Agreement will address expectations about appropriate and respectful behavior especially as it relates to the health and safety of themselves and others. Staff will work with residents and the neighbours to foster good neighbourhood relations.  Residents are expected to:

    • Treat neighbours and community with consideration;
    • Not make excessive noise or cause unnecessary disturbances;
    • Ensure security doors are closed properly and not let any unknown persons into the building;
    • Put garbage in the appropriate bins;
    • Clean up after pets;
    • Not smoke in the common areas, including the front entrance.

    HATS may end an agreement at any time if a resident is:

    • Engaging or behaving in a manner which is abusive and/or a threat to the mental or physical health or safety of anyone in the building/community;
    • Significantly disrupting the quiet enjoyment of other participants and/or neighbours; and
    • Engaging in willful vandalism or damage to the building or property.

    If HATS ends an agreement and evicts a resident, they would look into housing and shelter options, so that people will not become homeless again.

    The safety of our residents, staff and the community are of the utmost importance to us.

    Studies have shown that supportive housing actually make a positive difference in their communities. Supportive housing reduces homelessness and substance abuse, while increasing local spending. You can find out more about the effects of supportive housing in communities at the link below:

    https://letstalkhousingbc.ca/11538/documents/21319