Let's Talk Housing in Hope

BC Housing is proposing to build 52 new homes with supports that will be operated by the Hope and Area Transition Society (HATS). The property at 660/670 Old Hope Princeton Way is adjacent to the House of Hope, a permanent 20-bed shelter that HATS has operated since Fall 2018. BC Housing will be leading a rezoning application to the District of Hope for the supportive housing; this application will also include 650 Old Hope Princeton Way, the location of the shelter that HATS currently operates.

Service providers estimate there are more than 50 people experiencing homelessness in the area, not

BC Housing is proposing to build 52 new homes with supports that will be operated by the Hope and Area Transition Society (HATS). The property at 660/670 Old Hope Princeton Way is adjacent to the House of Hope, a permanent 20-bed shelter that HATS has operated since Fall 2018. BC Housing will be leading a rezoning application to the District of Hope for the supportive housing; this application will also include 650 Old Hope Princeton Way, the location of the shelter that HATS currently operates.

Service providers estimate there are more than 50 people experiencing homelessness in the area, not counting those already accessing the local shelter. There is currently no supportive housing in Hope, and the Hope shelter is operating at capacity. To address this urgent need, BC Housing has identified an opportunity to create 52 new homes with 24/7 supports for people experiencing or at risk of homelessness in Hope.

Housing with Support

Supportive housing is a self-contained studio home with supports provided on-site, to ensure people can achieve and maintain housing stability. The housing would be available to people who are homeless in the surrounding area and those currently living in House of Hope. BC Housing and HATS would lead the resident selection process, in collaboration with local service providers. All new residents would pay rent, sign a program agreement and good neighbour agreement.

CLOSED: Thank you for participating, this discussion has concluded.

  • I’ll like to know how to apply for housing in bc if I’m Not residing In another province

    Rebecca asked about 1 month ago

    Applicants for this supportive housing project or any other subsidized housing through BC Housing must permanently reside in British Columbia when applying.

  • Why are there no units for families?! And who decides the criteria for acceptance? Everyone has a right to housing in a province that doesn’t hold legal title to unceded Indigenous territory.

    Miranda asked 2 months ago

    Homes with supports for people experiencing or at risk of homelessness are being built because there is a need in the community. The building would accommodate couples in individual units. There are other projects in proposal and in development in Hope, such as new affordable rental housing for Indigenous families in partnership with Mamele'awt Qweesome Housing Society. We agree that more is needed and BC Housing continues to work with municipalities across the province on developing new housing options.

    People who apply to live here would need to meet eligibility requirements around income, homelessness and required supports and programming. Residents would be low-income individuals over the age of 19 who live in the community, have a history of homelessness or are at risk of homelessness and who need additional support services to maintain housing. Hope and area residents would have priority. BC Housing and HATS would collaborate with local service providers on a thoughtful and thorough assessment process to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports live in the housing.  Every potential resident would be considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services. 

  • Do the rental units include utilities?

    Rosalyn asked 4 months ago

    Yes, rent for supportive housing units, such as those proposed for 660/670 Old Hope Princeton Way,includes utilities, and two meals a day. Dishes, utensils and cooking equipment would also be provided. 

  • I am very much in favour of this facility going forward. Unfortunately many citizens of Hope do not understand homelessness and choose instead to judge those in need based on incorrect assumptions and stereotypes. It is unfortunate but I hope those that understand scientific method will prevail.

    AaronSecond asked 5 months ago

    hank you for your support of this proposal.

    As you are aware, those who are experiencing homelessness are not a homogenous group and have had different pathways into homelessness – they may be seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. That’s why supportive housing tailors its response to clients, to help them maintain their housing.

    We are hopeful that as we continue to work with those in the community who need our support, the rest of the residents of Hope will see that this proposal is a good thing.

    BC Housing has research to draw from that supports our experience that supportive housing is an attribute to a community. See the Document Library for further information.

    • Research completed in 2018/19 of 13 B.C. supportive housing sites – Community Benefits of Supportive Housing – found that:
      • property values immediately surrounding 10 of the sites either kept pace or surpassed surrounding municipal trends, while the values for the other three sites were not notably different compared to municipal trends.
      • Out of 152 residents, after six months living at seven of the supportive housing buildings:
        • 94% of supportive housing residents remained housed
        • 84% reported improved overall well-being
        • 54% reported improved access to employment opportunities
        • 39% report improvement in addictions issues.
    • 2018 studies in B.C. showed that every dollar invested in supportive housing creates four to five dollars in social and/or economic value. Government realizes about half of the savings due to decreased use of services, while neighbourhoods benefit from improved well-being and increased local spending.
    • Supportive housing is also less costly for taxpayers than doing nothing.
      • On average, a person experiencing homelessness with addictions and/or mental illness used $55,000 per year in health care and/or corrections services, compared to $37,000 for a person in supportive housing.
      • A 2019 B.C. study showed that supportive housing residents, when compared to emergency shelter clients, were 64% less likely than emergency shelter clients to use ambulance services and experienced 50% shorter hospital stays.

  • Let's compare the low barrier facility proposed for Hope with what has been implemented in Maple Ridge. The facilities in MR have negatively impacted the surrounding neighborhoods- this CANNOT be denied. What has HATS and BC Housing learned from the MŔ facilities insofar as what will be done better here in Hope to ensure the community will NOT be subjected to the same issues as those that have arisen in MR from the low barrier facilities there? There are many reasons for homelessness. Supportive housing for those presenting physical barriers, young adults aged out of care, those escaping spousal abuses, seniors who have lost their housing, and those who have completed detox, treatment and rehabilitation should NOT be housed in or near a facility that will also house addicts. Further, those in active addiction should be given the choice of detox, treatment and rehab BEFORE the provision of housing- for treatment to be effective, the desire to abandon the lifestyle must come from the addict and despite what we are being told, housing first is not effective encouragement for this to take place. What plans are there to increase treatment facilities since we are told of the inadequate number of these facilities in our province?

    CindyK asked 7 months ago

    Maple Ridge cannot be compared to the proposal for 660/670 Old Hope Princeton Way. This proposal is for permanent purpose-built housing with supports for Hope.

    The Maple Ridge community was experiencing concerns prior to the temporary supportive housing being built. This temporary supportive housing was a response to an emergency situation with many people living in camps. What BC Housing has learned is that if a community does not address its need for housing for supports at the earliest opportunity, it will find itself in a crisis situation sooner than later. There is a cost to doing nothing. We have also learned that community advisory committees allow partners to work together with the community to address any concerns that arise through collaboration.

    You express concern for those presenting physical barriers, young adults aged out of care, those escaping spousal abuses, seniors who have lost their housing, and those who have completed detox, treatment and rehabilitation - the reality is that many of  those individuals are also people who are using substances, and that many people experiencing homelessness are using substances as a way to cope with being homeless. Supportive housing can and will mitigate many seniors, vulnerable women and young adults from becoming homeless.

    BC Housing’s supportive housing buildings are operated based on the widely recognized and evidence-based Housing First model. Residents at these sites, and all other supportive housing buildings that BC Housing is affiliated with, are permitted to make their own choices in regard to lifestyle. This includes the decision to abstain or use drugs/alcohol in the privacy of their homes. If they choose to use, the operators will work with each tenant ensure they use safely. When residents are ready to make a change, staff on site will be able to support the residents by connecting them with the appropriate Fraser Health support services required to address their issues.

    The target population for the Housing First approach under the Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) is individuals who are chronically and episodically homeless. HPS has defined these populations as follows:

    • Chronically homeless refers to individuals, often with disabling conditions (e.g. chronic physical or mental illness, substance abuse problems), who are currently homeless and have been homeless for six months or more in the past year (i.e., have spent more than 180 cumulative nights in a shelter or place not fit for human habitation);
    • Episodically homeless refers to individuals, often with disabling conditions, who are currently homeless and have experienced three or more episodes of homelessness in the past year (of note, episodes are defined as periods when a person would be in a shelter or place not fit for human habitation, and after at least 30 days, would be back in the shelter or inhabitable location)

    The definitions of chronically and episodically homeless individuals include all sub-populations, such as Veterans and/or Aboriginals. The definitions also include individuals exiting institutions (e.g. child welfare system, mental health facilities, hospitals, etc) who have a history of chronic and episodic homelessness and cannot identify a fixed address upon their release.

    Fraser Health will continue to provide a range of inpatient and outpatient services to the community such as chronic disease management, mental health and substance use, and home and community care. New mental health funding is the responsibility of the Ministry of Mental Health and Substance Use.


  • Definitely support this. We desperately need affordable housing in Hope for people living on or on the verge of the street. Despite what some of the naysayers seem to think this isn't a problem that will just go away if we ignore it long enough.

    M asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • We are against this supportive housing proposed for Hope. Hope is a beautiful little town where many seniors live. The Senior Independent Living home is just across the road from this proposed building. Will their residents be in a safe environment when this facility is operating? Hope doesn’t have the support services that are needed to make this a safe facility.

    Milly asked 7 months ago

    Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

    Those who are experiencing homelessness are not a homogenous group and have had different pathways into homelessness – they may be seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. That’s why supportive housing tailors its response to clients, to help them maintain their housing.

    Residents would sign a Program Agreement and will be expected to abide by it. The Program Agreement will address expectations about appropriate and respectful behavior especially as it relates to the health and safety of themselves and others. Staff will work with residents and the neighbours to foster good neighbourhood relations.  Residents are expected to:

    • Treat neighbours and community with consideration;
    • Not make excessive noise or cause unnecessary disturbances;
    • Ensure security doors are closed properly and not let any unknown persons into the building;
    • Put garbage in the appropriate bins;
    • Clean up after pets;
    • Not smoke in the common areas, including the front entrance.

    HATS may end an agreement at any time if a resident is:

    • Engaging or behaving in a manner which is abusive and/or a threat to the mental or physical health or safety of anyone in the building/community;
    • Significantly disrupting the quiet enjoyment of other participants and/or neighbours; and
    • Engaging in willful vandalism or damage to the building or property.

    If HATS ends an agreement and evicts a resident, they would look into housing and shelter options, so that people will not become homeless again.

    Studies have shown that when housed, individuals spend more of their money in the community, therefore contributing financially to local businesses. In addition, those who find housing as a result of proposals like ours find increased personal happiness, healthier living conditions, an ability to engage in employment, reduced substance abuse and an increase in safety and social connections. You can find more information about the social return on investment in housing here: https://letstalkhousingbc.ca/11538/documents/21319


  • There is mention of supports. that can be accessed for these residents . Does Hope have these supports systems? Who pays for those services for them? Are they mandatory for those that need them ? Are they to be enforced? How and by who? Seems fraser health, our medical system and our policing are already out stretched. Where are these extra services to come from?

    Nad asked 7 months ago

    The supports referenced are on-site and can include outreach workers, wellness checks, life skills training, employment assistance, connection and referral to community services and support groups. Residents would also have access to counselling, as well as health, mental health and addiction recovery services through Fraser Health.

    BC Housing and HATS would collaborate with local service providers on a thoughtful and thorough assessment process with local service providers to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports live in the housing.  Every potential resident would be considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services.

    Residents would sign a Program Agreement and will be expected to abide by it. The Program Agreement will address expectations about appropriate and respectful behavior especially as it relates to the health and safety of themselves and others. Staff will work with residents and the neighbours to foster good neighbourhood relations. 

    Case management plans would be developed with all residents and it will be expected that all residents will work toward achieving the goals that they have set out for themselves. When a client/resident is not working toward their goals, conversation would happen, bringing to their attention the requirements of the program agreement and that their case management plan is part of their program agreement and they are jeopardizing their residency.  All residents would be assigned to a case manager and weekly meetings with their case manager would be conducted. 

  • A few questions for clarification. At the meeting, I was told that residents would pay $350 a month for rent. One of your replies to questions here stated that they would pay $375 -- which is correct? Will they have to pay for utilities -- electricity, etc ...? Also are the meals included in this or will they pay for the meals and if so, how much would the cost be to the resident? With the figure of $710 welfare per month that leaves them with approximately $300 per month for their expenses -- food, toiletries (soap, toothpaste, deodorant, hygiene products), medicine, toilet paper, kleenex, paper towels, clothing, household necessities such as laundry detergent, dish soap, cleaning supplies, pet food and other products for pets, etc ... and cigarettes/drugs/alcohol if they are so inclined. If phone service or other electronic costs (cable tv) are not included, how is it feasible that they will be able to manage financially? Also, it would be of great interest to many to see an actual program agreement which you mentioned in many communications, that all residents must sign and abide by. Will you be posting this and any other documentation requiring to be signed, somewhere on your site or will one be provided to Council as a matter of public record? If the latter, when will this be submitted and if so, will this form the documentation when your organization applies for the zoning change? another question with regard to the following from your handout -- "Residents will be low-income individuals over the age of 19 who live in the community, have a history of homelessness and who need additional support services to maintain housing. Hope and area residents will have priority. " It would be helpful if you would define: low income individuals, additional support services and Hope and area residents -- especially the term 'resident'. Next, referring to this from your communications material, "...with supports provided on-site, to ensure people can achieve and maintain housing stability. Supports include outreach workers, wellness checks, life skills training, employment assistance, connection and referral to community services and support groups." "Residents have access to counselling, as well as health, mental health, and addiction recovery services through Fraser Health." Please define 'on-site' and 'access to'. You state that Fraser Health will provide these services, has there been a written commitment from Fraser Health, and if so, how is it possible that an already overburdened system in Hope, is not just willing but capable of fulfilling this? How will this affect the services to others in Hope? Where and when will the poster boards be available on line? I was told at the meeting that they would probably be available on line. In closing, assuming that some of the residents will be successful, where will they move to? Hope already has an acute housing shortage for people who work and can live independently so how will they make that transition and to where? Or rather, will this, by default, become a permanent housing situation? I appreciate your having this forum for people to ask questions and find answers. I hope that this will enable the people of Hope to make an informed decision about this project and its value to our community.

    hope homework asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback. It will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

    The rent for a studio apartment including two meals a day and utilities, is $375 a month. Dishes, utensils, cooking equipment would be provided with the apartment. Residents would pay for their necessities through the income that they have access to, some people experiencing homelessness have full-time or part-time employment. Others, once they have stable housing, can work toward seeking employment options, whether part or full-time employment. 

    Program agreements are developed by an operator prior to a building opening. We can provide a sample program agreement - please visit the Document Library on this page for reference - but please note that agreements are adapted to meet community need.

    BC Housing does have a glossary of terms that might be useful when reading through some of our materials. It can be found here: https://www.bchousing.org/glossary

    Low income: Household earnings in relation to housing. BC Housing uses different ways to describe low income, depending on the program or service it relates to.

    Additional support and services refer to those people and services residents will have access to help maintain their housing. It can include outreach workers, wellness checks, life skills training, employment assistance, and referral to community services and support groups. Residents also have access to counselling, as well as health, mental health and addiction recovery services.

    Hope and area residents means people who reside in Hope and when necessary, up the Fraser Canyon and into Boston Bar, through this coverage has been limited in the past.

    The poster boards from the meeting are available now at the following link:

    https://letstalkhousingbc.ca/11538/documents/21682

    On-site is exactly what it sounds like – some of the supports will be available to residents in the building. Same with access to! The goal is to make it as easy as possible for residents to connect with the supports they need to be successful in maintaining their housing.

    Fraser Health will continue to provide a range of inpatient and outpatient services to the community such as chronic disease management, mental health and substance use, and home and community care. The people who would apply for the proposed housing are already living in Hope – these are not new people.

    People experiencing homelessness are not a homogenous group and have had different pathways into homelessness – they may be seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. That’s why supportive housing tailors its response to clients, to help them maintain their housing.

    More is needed. There are other projects in proposal and in development in Hope, such as new affordable rental housing for Indigenous families in partnership with Mamele'awt Qweesome Housing Society. BC Housing continues to work with municipalities across the province on developing new housing options.

    The goal is that this proposal becomes the crucial first step for those in your community to find a more permanent solution to the housing crisis they find themselves in. 

  • I have serious issues with this project coming to hope, i don't trust HATS as we have seen before how well the thunderbird project was run. It brought a boat load of homeless to our town. i see this as another attractant. I also see that there are some serious security issues for the residents, for the workers and for the local neighbors. No where in this project its listed that a criminal record check is going to be done prior to them entering and living in this building. so that being said. How is the staff going to feel safe and secure, how are the people who are actually seeking to get true help not fall victim to the predatory capabilities of those who deal drugs and do drugs when one person in one room is trying to be clean and the other is allowed to do drugs? I have not seen anywhere on any of the paperwork that drugs and alcohol WON'T be permitted on the premises. What safeguards are in place for your workers? Also, Is this another "low barrier" housing project or is this a NO TOLERANCE. building like i've mentioned a million times over. People that are on drugs who do not wish to stop doing drugs should NOT live in a building like this. This building is being build very close to an old age home where your planning on bringing 52 homeless / street people to come live. How can you protect them from the folks that have these major mental health issues? Are you willing to be responsible for the increase crime in the neighborhood? Will you be held accountable if anyone openly attacks people in the area because you have decided to harbor criminals? I know that people need a place to live and a chance at a sense of home and security. but you need to triage this with the true homeless who want help and the ones who want a shelter over their heads to continue their criminal activity in this town. This is a very very fine line and this is where you need to take a responsible approach and make it a real contract that gives them accountability and an actual place where they can get help.

    nathalie asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback. It will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

    We agree that the Thunderbird is not an ideal housing situation for people experiencing homelessness. The Thunderbird is a not supportive housing – as is proposed at 660/670 Old Hope Princeton Way – it is a temporary housing unit, without supports, where people are precariously housed, with monthly risk of eviction. Homes with supports is the next step for people who are experiencing homelessness in shelter or on the street, and those who are at risk for homelessness so that they can remain in Hope, which is what this project is aiming to create.

    Those who are experiencing homelessness are not a homogenous group and have had different pathways into homelessness – they may be seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. That’s why supportive housing tailors its response to clients, to help them maintain their housing.

    Residents would sign a Program Agreement and will be expected to abide by it. The Program Agreement will address expectations about appropriate and respectful behavior especially as it relates to the health and safety of themselves and others. Staff will work with residents and the neighbours to foster good neighbourhood relations.  Residents are expected to:

    • Treat neighbours and community with consideration;
    • Not make excessive noise or cause unnecessary disturbances;
    • Ensure security doors are closed properly and not let any unknown persons into the building;
    • Put garbage in the appropriate bins;
    • Clean up after pets;
    • Not smoke in the common areas, including the front entrance.

    HATS may end an agreement at any time if a resident is:

    • Engaging or behaving in a manner which is abusive and/or a threat to the mental or physical health or safety of anyone in the building/community;
    • Significantly disrupting the quiet enjoyment of other participants and/or neighbours; and
    • Engaging in willful vandalism or damage to the building or property.

    If HATS ends an agreement and evicts a resident, they would look into housing and shelter options, so that people will not become homeless again.

    The safety of our residents, staff and the community are of the utmost importance to us.

    Studies have shown that supportive housing actually make a positive difference in their communities. Supportive housing reduces homelessness and substance abuse, while increasing local spending. You can find out more about the effects of supportive housing in communities at the link below:

    https://letstalkhousingbc.ca/11538/documents/21319

  • I fully support this project and view it as a gift to our community and to our most vulnerable citizens. Hope has a significant number of homeless individuals, as well as many individuals who are precariously housed (e.g., living in sheds, shacks or their vehicles). There are also a number of individuals living in substandard housing, who are at risk due to inadequate basic services, like heat and water. Hope is an amazing community with a can do attitude. I am confident that the committed service providers in our community will embrace this project and help the individuals living there to maximize their capacities. A vote for this project is a vote for Hope's can do attitude!

    catherineolof asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback. We agree that Hope is an incredible community with committed and engaged service providers. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • A famous quote from Mahatma Gandhi: 'the true measure of any society can be found in how it treats its most vulnerable members'. Supportive housing in Hope would be a gift to our community and to those who struggle. All Canadians have the right to live with dignity.

    Carol T asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • It seems part of my comments and questions disappeared. Considering who the designated contractor is for the project, much doubt exists about their having fulfilled the goals of the now defunct Thunderbird Project. Who was performing oversight on the Thunderbird? Does anyone know the actual success/results of that program? In other words, where are the participants now? Not much faith in meeting the desired outcomes for the homeless at the proposed project.

    hope homework asked 7 months ago

    We agree that the Thunderbird is not an ideal housing situation for people experiencing homelessness. The Thunderbird is a not supportive housing – as is proposed at 660/670 Old Hope Princeton Way – it is a temporary housing unit, without supports, where people are precariously housed, with monthly risk of eviction. Homes with supports is the next step for people living in the shelter so that they can remain in Hope, which is what this project is aiming to create.

    Studies done on the effects of supportive housing on their communities have found that homelessness and substance abuse are reduced, residents became able to engage in employment and local spending increases. For more information on supportive housing in communities, check out the link below:

    https://letstalkhousingbc.ca/11538/documents/21319

  • I agree the town/province and country has reached a crisis in dealing with the homeless, poverty and mental health issues. There is no one solution to help end the crisis. This problem is way bigger then a town like Hope can handle when similar projects such as these have already been in place in big cities and they are not working at achieving the goals they set. I support and believe the province and federal government need to step up to the plate and think of regional solutions in each province instead of leaving it up to not for profit organizations within small municipalities to solve. This project will only put a bandaid on the every growing issues we have with affordable housing. The high cost of everything is putting the average working family/person on or almost below the poverty line facing housing crisis ....the province can't even find solutions to help these people never mind trying to help people with addictions and mental health crises. I feel this is not the model that will help the most vulnerable, there needs to be a institutional type housing/medical help/care plan with restrictions. If people want help in bettering themselves or healing, one should not be against an institution type model plan. This plan is a basic model of the Thunderbird project (Housing first) which never amounted to what the vision was back then and thousand of dollars later in the pockets of a select few and now they are trying again with new grants and funding.The little town of Hope already is at capacity within the mental health offices and allowing a plan like this to take place will just put a further burden on services. I do support this model of action plan but it needs to be in a bigger region then in a town under 6000 population. Its time all municipalities/citizens start urging our mla's to approach federal government to create real solutions to address all entities of poverty and sickness.

    dnatt asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback. It will be included in the summary report.

    You are correct that more is needed. There are other projects in proposal and in development in Hope, such as new affordable rental housing for Indigenous families in partnership with Mamele'awt Qweesome Housing Society. BC Housing continues to work with municipalities across the province on developing new housing options.

    This proposal would bring in supports and services that people who are homeless or at-risk of homelessness in your community need. Every potential resident would be considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services.


  • Why would you place 52 units in a town with only a population of just over 6,000 ? The City of Chilliwack has a population of over 80, 000 and currently has only 92 units. Also, why was there barely any advertisement of the information session and why were they done during the week when most people were working and unable to attend ? The scope of this project is far to big for our small town to handle. During the session a BC housing representative said there were 40 homeless individuals, but your site says 60 ? What is the correct information?

    ldruet asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback. It will be included in the summary report.

    The last homeless count, which was done two years ago in 2017, found 36 people identifying as homeless in Hope. Currently, there are 20 people at the House of Hope shelter and six people accessing Extreme Weather response, plus there are at least 25 people who are precariously housed, and then in addition another 50 who are being supported through the Homeless Outreach Team in the community. Homes with supports is the next step for people living in the shelter so that they can remain in Hope, and we understand that 52 homes is a suitable number of homes to meet community need.

    Two sessions were held on December 5, from 2:00-3:30pm and 5:30-7:00pm. Letters were sent to a 200m radius of addresses from the site, and sessions were advertised in the Hope Standard on November 28 and December 5.

  • If this is going to be another ThunderBird then I am completely against it. If it is going to be run by HATS then it is another Thunderbird. I sat in the Thunderbird parking lot and watched drug deals go down while the in charge person stood there and watched them too. There is enough drugs and crime in our little community to be against this. I would prefer that it doesn't happen. Especially if HATS is in charge.

    islandbev asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback. It will be included in the summary report.

    We understand how disconcerting it is to watch people engaging in substance abuse in your community. It’s important to remember that people who are homeless are not a homogeneous group – there are unfortunately many ways that a person can find themselves without a home. They may be seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. That’s why supportive housing tailors its response to clients, to help them maintain their housing.

    The proposal for 660/670 Old Hope Princeton Way is for permanent homes with supports for people experiencing or at risk of homelessness. The Thunderbird is a precarious housing option, with monthly risk of eviction.

    BC Housing and HATS would collaborate with local service providers on a thoughtful and thorough assessment process with local service providers to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports live in the housing.  Every potential resident would be considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services.

    HATS is an experienced local provider that has been operating in the community since 1994 and offer four broad streams of services; domestic violence, substance use services, homelessness and youth and family services. Learn more: https://hopetransition.org/

  • A day late of the deadline but never to late to support this urgently needed project coming into Hope. Thank you.

    pattid asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal.

  • Will there be an OPS on site? If so, how will it be managed?

    Curio123 asked 7 months ago

    We take a harm reduction approach, which means staff is available to support any residents who are in various phases of substance use and the building will be set up with the ability to provide a safe consumption space for residents only, to ensure the safety of residents who are active substance users. As part of the program, residents make their own choices in regard to lifestyle and are supported in efforts to work on their health and well-being. HATS would work with Fraser Health in determining the best practices to ensure residents are safe and healthy. Onsite Substance Use services would be made available for clients, as well the development of Peer Support programs.


  • i have known a few people personally and re-heard the story repeated on local facebook circles. people that were employed or running a profitable business forced to leave the Hope area because there was not sufficient affordable rental property. It is great that our region presents house prices that are more attractive than metro Vancouver. the lump sum of a down payment may still be out of the range of the average family, and banks/mortgage brokers may still deny people's chance of building equity versus throwing away monthly rental costs. strategies to encourage real estate owners to make rental suites and carriage houses available would help. strategies to assist people to meet down payment and mortgage approval would also be welcome.

    john asked 7 months ago

    BC Housing welcomes the opportunity to work with individuals and organizations to create affordable housing solutions. Learn more: www.bchousing.org/housinghub

  • I am thrilled to see this coming to Hope. I fully believe in a Housing First approach to dealing with social issues in a given community. The project has my full support, but I do want to make it clear that the adoption of a Housing First approach means that other community agencies need to be resourced properly to provide what comes second and third - things like better mental health and addiction services, more transitional housing, etc. It is my hope that agencies such as Hope and District and Fraser Health will be providing the necessary supports to see the continued health and healing of those in need.

    kuhnfam asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • The dialogue in our community regarding the issue of supportive housing has provided an opportunity for me to get educated using fact based information rather than subjective opinions. This process has opened my eyes to how far reaching homelessness is and that offering resources such as supportive housing is a moral duty as Canadian citizens.

    Deb Pauls asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • I am in favor of this housing initiative for Hope. The vulnerable population are in need of a supported residence. The emergency shelter is not permanent housing. Because there are very limited rentals, there needs to be more options. And more options for those who have very low income, physical and mental challenges, and other medical concerns including substance use. Individuals will almost never look at their substance use issues if not housed, and "just housed" isn't the answer either. Studies have shown that "community" and "connection" is what works best. The location is close to downtown for shopping, appointments, the Mental Health Office and Hospital with RCMP right next door. I am hopeful that the town council votes in favor of this housing project. My questions are always - What is the alternative? What will happen without this housing? Poverty, Homelessness, and a variety of health issues are not going away....

    RoxanneT asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

    If this proposal for homes with supports is not approved, people will continue to live without access to safe, stable homes, often with deteriorating health. There is a cost to doing nothing. https://www.homelesshub.ca/costofhomelessness

  • I agree with this project as I know that even though the actual homeless count is 32, there are people with mental health challenges, that cannot work right now, have very little income, have to couch surf with family and friends and they are at risk of homelessness. They are not thieves, they are good people who need help, they are residents of Hope for over 20 years. I get tired of hearing that the homeless are all addicted and thieves. The people saying that are stigmatizing people and scapegoating some really good people that have contributed to this community when they could and would be able to again if they got the supports they needed, starting with a roof over their head and some support. We need this project here.

    SO asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • I am thrilled to see this project coming to Hope. We desperately need low cost housing. I think the location is excellent and the project looks excellent.

    Peter asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • I fully support this proposal. Supportive housing is so greatly needed in this community.

    Stephen Dunn asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • The demand for housing is higher than the estimates. There are people who are not necessarily homeless but living in very meagre accomodation and forced to share with othe's of similarly limited means. There are people that would benefit from the supportive nature of the proposed housing that are now a burden on family and friends both financially and where the family/friends are ill-equpped to provide the necessary care where physical/mental health issues exist. There are plenty people living beyond their means and slowly sinking into debt that may push them into the category of homelessness without some effort to motivate real estate owners to provide suites, carriage houses etc. There are people with serious mental health concerns that are not receiving care because these people can not consistently make appointments with professionals or agencies. The Joan Greenwood complex was originally supposed to be a temporary solution and yet many residents there are now long term. Please be assured that there is a strong need and plenty existing local demand for additional housing, both affordable, subsidized and supported.

    john asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

    You are correct that people experiencing homelessness are not a homogenous group and have had different pathways into homelessness – they may be seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. That’s why supportive housing tailors its response to clients, to help them maintain their housing.

    More is needed. There are other projects in proposal and in development in Hope, such as new affordable rental housing for Indigenous families in partnership with Mamele'awt Qweesome Housing Society. BC Housing continues to work with municipalities across the province on developing new housing options.


  • The problems I would have with this is the same as the Thunderbird project. All it has done in my opinion is brought more crime , more drug use, and a complete feeling of people’s safety being compromised. Constantly a steady stream of people walking or riding their stolen bikes from the Thunderbird to the local overpasses to shoot drugs and leave their needles behind. Go to town and aggressively panhandle. Crime rate in Hope has skyrocketed. I am fully supportive to the people that would like to get off drugs and change their lives. But the main problem I have is a high percentage of these people do not want to live under these roofs and abide by their rules. Eventually these people are asked to leave and end up living under our bridges and in the woods around town. This will greatly increase our homeless population in Hope in no time. Guaranteed it will happen. Our nice little town is on its way out.

    Dr. asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback, it will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

    We agree that the Thunderbird is not an ideal housing situation for people experiencing homelessness. The Thunderbird is a not supportive housing – as is proposed at 660/670 Old Hope Princeton Way – it is a temporary housing unit, without supports, where people are precariously housed, with monthly risk of eviction. Homes with supports is the next step for people who are experiencing homelessness in shelter or on the street, and those who are at risk for homelessness so that they can remain in Hope, which is what this project is aiming to create.

    The last homeless count, which was done two years ago in 2017, found 36 people identifying as homeless in Hope. Outreach workers currently report over 50 people experiencing homelessness. House of Hope is at capacity with 20 people staying, 25 people are precariously housed at the Thunderbird Motel with monthly risk of eviction and there are camps set up around the community. Homes with supports is the next step for people living in the shelter so that they can remain in Hope, and we understand that 52 homes is a suitable number of homes to meet community need.

    BC Housing and HATS would collaborate with local service providers on a thoughtful and thorough assessment process with local service providers to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports live in the housing.  Every potential resident would be considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services.

    Residents would sign a Program Agreement and will be expected to abide by it. The Program Agreement will address expectations about appropriate and respectful behavior especially as it relates to the health and safety of themselves and others. Staff will work with residents and the neighbours to foster good neighbourhood relations.  Residents are expected to:

    • Treat neighbours and community with consideration;
    • Not make excessive noise or cause unnecessary disturbances;
    • Ensure security doors are closed properly and not let any unknown persons into the building;
    • Put garbage in the appropriate bins;
    • Clean up after pets;
    • Not smoke in the common areas, including the front entrance.

    HATS may end an agreement at any time if a resident is:

    • Engaging or behaving in a manner which is abusive and/or a threat to the mental or physical health or safety of anyone in the building/community;
    • Significantly disrupting the quiet enjoyment of other participants and/or neighbours; and
    • Engaging in willful vandalism or damage to the building or property.

    If HATS ends an agreement and evicts a resident, they would look into housing and shelter options, so that people will not become homeless again

    Studies have shown that when housed, individuals spend more of their money in the community, therefore contributing financially to local businesses. In addition, those who find housing as a result of proposals like ours find increased personal happiness, healthier living conditions, an ability to engage in employment, reduced substance abuse and an increase in safety and social connections. You can find more information about the social return on investment in housing here: https://letstalkhousingbc.ca/11538/documents/21319


  • N age 56: I think supportive housing is a marvelous idea, I currently live at the Thunderbird motel which is 5.4 km from the nearest grocery store and 2 km from the nearest bus stop. Due to my medical problems and Mobility issues this is a real problem for me. I would very much like to live closer to town but the rental and availability is out of my price range and the availability is nill. I know a number of people in virtually the same situation as I and feel that this subsided housing is desperately needed. Thank you for your attention.

    Different community Members asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • B 55 male - I would like this supportive housing to come to the community because it would be a bigger place to live and more affordable.

    Different community Members asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • T 51 male - I feel that Hope in general needs more affordable housing due to people being unable to afford $650 a month for rent. Not to mention where I am currently staying is out of town. There is no transit buses that run out this way. No way to get groceries from out of town if you do not have a vehicle. Hope is a very nice place to live instead of being in the city. It is a beautiful place to be. If you want to live somewhere close to the city but not to far this is a great place to live and we need more housing here. There is a lot of people who need BC Housing and the location where they want to put it is close to Hope which gives everyone access to resources. Since everywhere else has BC Housing why not Hope? A lot of people need it.

    Different community Members asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • D 52 Male - All the supports use to come here, and then they got taken all away. I miss having supports where I live and that is why I want the supportive housing to come to the community of Hope. We have no affordable housing in Hope, I don't understand why it is a question. Its needed. (What the F*$6)

    Different community Members asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • N 43 female - I have a brain injury and it is hard for me to remember what I am doing. I wish we had supportive housing where I have the supports that can help me live day to day. I also want somewhere to live that is affordable and in town so I can see my doctor or get groceries.

    Different community Members asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • R 63 female - Currently I am unable to get around to appointments or get any groceries. I think it is a wonderful idea to have subsided housing. Even though we are not thought about (people living in poverty) everything costs more yet we are still trying to make due with what we have. Subsided housing would help a lot. I am 5 km from a grocery store and 2 km from a bus stop and I have mobility issues. I cannot walk that far.

    Different community Members asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • K 73 male - I think supportive housing should come to the community to help the homeless. All I worry about is if pets are allowed? People need to have their pets too!

    Different community Members asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

    Pets would be welcome, as long as they are not causing a disturbance or putting people at risk of harm (as deemed by staff.)

  • L 66 male - I think it is in a good location, its not right downtown and its close to the police and supports at the emergency shelter. Its close to shopping and necessities. What is your policy on rents compared to the other subsidized housing project in town? Anhart is 10% less than the market, how much are the units that you are building? If I am on a pension, am I still eligible for this housing? And is there going to be security onsite?

    Different community Members asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

    Future residents would need to pay $375 for monthly rent, which includes a studio apartment and on-site supports, as well as two meals per day.

    Security of the site would be maintained through 24/7 staff, program agreements signed by all residents and design features such as optimized lighting, security cameras, fob access, staffed reception, contained outdoor space for smoking and dog walking. 

  • T 51 female - Supportive housing would help a lot of people who are low income to have safe and clean accommodations. It would take people off the streets, out of the bush and in turn will help our environment in Hope.

    Different community Members asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • B 34 female - Supportive housing should be here because there isn't enough housing and or assistance for the people that need it.

    Different community Members asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • W 51 female - I would like to see affordable housing be close to town. Currently where I live I have a hard time getting to town and I cannot afford a place that is in town, which affordable housing I could live close to everything I need to survive. I want a place I can call home.

    Different community Members asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • I have lived in Hope since 1974. I work for HATS in Hope. I have seen the homeless rates rise. Because of discrimination people in Hope cannot get housing. More and more tents go up in the bushes out lining Hope and area. This housing project is the best thing that has happened to Hope. Because of the highway junction our population in Hope is growing, as well as the homeless population. Single parents cannot find affordable housing as well. This housing project will help so many and make the most of our small town.

    Ilene Ajtay asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. We look forward to continuing to work with HATS. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • This is an excellent proposal that is badly needed in Hope. It is the perfect location to help those who need it. Please proceed and thanks

    Marlateach asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.


  • How far and wide will you accept the homeless from? across the valley, or across Canada? Or just Hope residents? Who will take responsibility when the level of theft in the area skyrockets? Since 2018 there has been a noticeable rise in people begging for money outside places like the bank and grocery stores, I am greatly concerned for the safety of our children. My kids would need to walk past this place walking to school etc... This is a horrible idea, let the homeless go to another community. Good thing the hospital is close by for them when the violence starts... Our council in Hope must be idiots.

    concerned and aware asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

    The last homeless count, which was done two years ago in 2017, found 36 people identifying as homeless in Hope. Outreach workers currently report over 50 people experiencing homelessness. House of Hope is at capacity with 20 people staying, 25 people are precariously housed at the Thunderbird Motel with monthly risk of eviction and there are camps set up around the community. Homes with supports is the next step for people living in the shelter so that they can remain in Hope, and we understand that 52 homes is a suitable number of homes to meet community need.

    Hope residents would have priority for the new supportive housing. All new applications would be reviewed based on suitability of applicants, with priority to those who live in Hope. Most of the people who would apply to live in the new supportive housing are already known to outreach workers in the community. In our experience, people who are experiencing homelessness who enter stable housing want to be connected to the support networks that they’ve developed, which means remaining in the community that they are living in, or returning to a community where they have preestablished networks, such as family. BC Housing is working on building new supportive housing across the region and province, with new developments in Abbotsford and Chilliwack, so people can remain living in the communities in which they are currently located.

    People who would live in this proposed housing are already part of the community, this proposal is a home with supports, a place to come inside and work towards stability.

    Studies have shown that when housed, individuals spend more of their money in the community, therefore contributing financially to local businesses. In addition, those who find housing as a result of proposals like ours find increased personal happiness, healthier living conditions, an ability to engage in employment, reduced substance abuse and an increase in safety and social connections. You can find more information about the social return on investment in housing here:

    https://letstalkhousingbc.ca/11538/documents/21319

  • Supportive housing is greatly needed in Hope. For the size of our community we have a very large population of homeless people. Many of our homeless have complex addiction, mental and physical health issues as well as many young adults and seniors who are simply unable to find housing they can afford. The existing shelter is unable to provide services for all the vulnerable homeless in our community as a result people are turned away even during summer months as there are not have enough beds. In the past 2 years most landlords have doubled the rents in Hope being the reach of low income individuals including senior citizens. Some of the medical conditions of our homeless include chronic pain from workplace injuries, epilepsy, Parkinson's desease, brain injuries, and diabetes. These people are at risk of dying without support and housing.

    Lynda Maxim asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. All the reasons that you list are reasons why we believe that this proposal is necessary. Your feedback will be included in the summary report to the District of Hope.

  • I have no questions, only a request...please force the town of Hope to have this Supportive Housing. It would be awful to not have this project in our town. This is needed and I believe would be devastating if it wasn't in our town.

    mrslarissak asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. We look forward to working with the District of Hope to make this a reality.


  • One of the poster boards said that residents would be fed one meal per day. Will this be prepared on site or supplied by a restaurant or other food provider? Will apartment kitchens be stocked with dishes, cooking equipment, utensils, etc...? Will there be a common dining area? How will residents pay for their groceries, household necessities?

    hope homework asked 7 months ago

    The poster boards state that resident would have access to breakfast and one hot meal per day. The meals would be prepared on-site in a commercial kitchen and served in a common dining area. Residents would also have their own kitchenette in their studio apartment. Dishes, utensils, cooking equipment would be provided with the apartment. Residents would pay for their necessities through the income that they have access to, some people experiencing homelessness have full-time or part-time employment. Others, once they have stable housing, can work toward seeking employment options, whether part or full-time employment. 


  • If space doesn’t fill up from locals will you bring other people here to fill up the space ? Once in place is this the final maximum number of rooms or will you plan to add more in the future ? Will you screen clients & guests efficiently, implementing more care plans / recovery / responsibility / accountability? Will you implement a ZERO tolerance for violence policy ?

    Hope_g5 asked 7 months ago

    The last homeless count, which was done two years ago in 2017, found 36 people identifying as homeless in Hope. Outreach workers currently report over 50 people experiencing homelessness. House of Hope is at capacity with 20 people staying, 25 people are precariously housed at the Thunderbird Motel with monthly risk of eviction and there are camps set up around the community. Homes with supports is the next step for people living in the shelter so that they can remain in Hope, and we understand that 52 homes is a suitable number of homes to meet community need.

    Hope residents would have priority for the new supportive housing. All new applications would be reviewed based on suitability of applicants, with priority to those who live in Hope. Most of the people who would apply to live in the new supportive housing are already known to outreach workers in the community. In our experience, people who are experiencing homelessness who enter stable housing want to be connected to the support networks that they’ve developed, which means remaining in the community that they are living in, or returning to a community where they have preestablished networks, such as family. BC Housing is working on building new supportive housing across the region and province, with new developments in Abbotsford and Chilliwack, so people can remain living in the communities in which they are currently located.

    The proposed building would not be extended, the plan is for space to accommodate need in the community.

    BC Housing and HATS would collaborate with local service providers on a thoughtful and thorough assessment process with local service providers to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports live in the housing.  Every potential resident would be considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services.

    Residents would sign a Program Agreement and will be expected to abide by it. The Program Agreement will address expectations about appropriate and respectful behavior especially as it relates to the health and safety of themselves and others. Staff will work with residents and the neighbours to foster good neighbourhood relations.  Residents are expected to:

    • Treat neighbours and community with consideration;
    • Not make excessive noise or cause unnecessary disturbances;
    • Ensure security doors are closed properly and not let any unknown persons into the building;
    • Put garbage in the appropriate bins;
    • Clean up after pets;
    • Not smoke in the common areas, including the front entrance.

    HATS may end an agreement at any time if a resident is:

    • Engaging or behaving in a manner which is abusive and/or a threat to the mental or physical health or safety of anyone in the building/community;
    • Significantly disrupting the quiet enjoyment of other participants and/or neighbours; and
    • Engaging in willful vandalism or damage to the building or property.

    If HATS ends an agreement and evicts a resident, they would look into housing and shelter options, so that people will not become homeless again.

  • do the residents have to follow cleanliness rules? Will they be subject to room searches? Due to hoarding tendencies, how do you know what’s going into each room, gasoline, weapons, open flame what if a persons room is creating a fire hazard .. will you know ? What will happen ?

    Hope_g5 asked 7 months ago

    People who experience homelessness are as varied as any other neighbour. They are seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. All residents in supportive housing have made a choice to work towards living a healthy, stable life.

    That said, residents will be required to sign a program agreement as well as a good neighbour agreement. These agreements will set forth the rules for living in the units and are geared towards the safety of the residents themselves, staff and the community.

  • Single parents with children that need admitted help are they going to be priority?

    La Fraser asked 7 months ago

    Residents would be low-income individuals over the age of 19 who live in the community, have a history of homelessness or are at risk of homelessness and who need additional support services to maintain housing. These would be studio apartments, designed for one person to live in each apartment.

    Homes with supports are being built because there is a need in the community. There are other projects in proposal and in development in Hope, such as new affordable rental housing for Indigenous families in partnership with Mamele'awt Qweesome Housing Society. We will continue to work with the District of Hope and community partners on new affordable housing options.

  • Do you make the residents of hope bc the priority ? Seems they may not be the priority due to you allow, shouldn’t the residents of hope bc come first “ current supportive housing tenant requesting a transfer to be placed where they would like to be “

    Hope_g5 asked 7 months ago

    The last homeless count, which was done two years ago in 2017, found 36 people identifying as homeless in Hope. Outreach workers currently report over 50 people experiencing homelessness. House of Hope is at capacity with 20 people staying, 25 people are precariously housed at the Thunderbird Motel with monthly risk of eviction and there are camps set up around the community. Homes with supports is the next step for people living in the shelter so that they can remain in Hope, and we understand that 52 homes is a suitable number of homes to meet community need.

    Hope residents would have priority for the new supportive housing. All new applications would be reviewed based on suitability of applicants, with priority to those who live in Hope. Most of the people who would apply to live in the new supportive housing are already known to outreach workers in the community. In our experience, people who are experiencing homelessness who enter stable housing want to be connected to the support networks that they’ve developed, which means remaining in the community that they are living in, or returning to a community where they have preestablished networks, such as family. BC Housing is working on building new supportive housing across the region and province, with new developments in Abbotsford and Chilliwack, so people can remain living in the communities in which they are currently located.

  • If selected, how much will residents pay to rent their room in this shelter ? Will long term residents have to start paying a fee .. to help build skills in life ?

    Hope_g5 asked 7 months ago

    Future residents would need to pay $375 for monthly rent, which includes a studio apartment and on-site supports, including two meals per day. This is permanent supportive housing, so some residents may reside here permanently. Others may decide to move into more independent housing; staff can provide support for those making this choice by assisting them in the transition process in viewing potential apartments and liaising with landlords on their behalf, and also work with BC Housing to explore other housing options and program/services.

  • Why are there not stipulations to living? If you want housing you should be required to improve your station in life. There needs to be a requirement to access support and not just an option.

    Erinn asked 7 months ago

    Supportive housing is for those experiencing or at risk of homelessness with varying health and personal challenges and needs. People experiencing homelessness are not a homogenous group, and have had different pathways into homelessness, that’s why supportive housing tailors its response to clients, to help them maintain their housing. BC Housing and HATS will lead the selection process with local service providers. All residents would be required to sign a program agreement and pay rent. Residents would have access to counselling, as well as mental health and addiction recovery services through Fraser Health.

  • Does a single pwd have a chance ?? I have MS and anxiety issues , but I've never been late on rent or bills

    Brother110 asked 7 months ago

    The proposal for 660/670 Old Hope Princeton Way is for homes for people experiencing or at risk of homelessness who need additional supports to maintain housing stability. Homes with supports are being built because there is a need in the community. There are other projects in proposal and in development in Hope, such as new affordable rental housing for Indigenous families in partnership with Mamele'awt Qweesome Housing Society. BC Housing continues to work with municipalities across the province on developing new housing options.

    BC Housing has a range of programs to provide housing assistance. This includes various subsidized housing options as well as rent supplements in which part of an individual’s rent is paid for by BC Housing. You can view this site to search housing listings in a specific area: https://www.bchousing.org/housing-assistance/rental-housing/housing-listings(External link) or use the Program Finder to learn which programs you may be eligible for: https://programfinder.bchousing.org/programfinder/faces/start(External link) 

    Please phone the BC Housing Applicant Services at 1-800-257-7756 if you would like to discuss your options


  • I don't have a question. I have a comment. Since the 20 bed shelter in Hope has opened I have noticed fewer 'lost' individuals on the street. It has done a great job of connecting people to services and curbing the issues on the streets. What a spectacular next step for the District of Hope. 52 units of Supportive Housing to address the needs of our most vulnerable population is a treat to say the least. I have a family of 4 and have lived and worked in Hope for over 27 years. Our family fully supports this much needed facility. I would like to add that ideally, there would be additional funding that comes with the supportive housing to help ease some of the stress that our resources are currently experiencing. Thank you BC Housing and Government of BC for allowing people to live with dignity, out of harms way all while being supported. I'd like to let District of Hope Council know that it is a perfect opportunity to also create year round jobs, in case they don't realize how it impacts the community from an economic development perspective. See council sometimes can't see their nose despite their face.

    hemperess asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your support of this proposal. Your observations are spot on when it comes to the difference supportive housing makes in a community. For more information, take a look at this report on Property Values and Supportive Housing: https://letstalkhousingbc.ca/11538/documents/21318

  • Has this proposal been abandoned? It is my understanding that as of this date, March 23, 2020, a rezoning application has not yet been submitted. If the proposal is still being considered why the delay in this first step?

    Bruce asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your message. The application to rezone 650/660/670 Old Princeton Way was submitted on March 20, 2020. On March 24, 2020, the District of Hope suspended all Council Meetings and Public Hearings due to COVID-19, until further notice.