Mission - 7460 Hurd Street

A blueprint sketch of a three-storey housing building.


BC Housing and the City of Mission are working together to build 50 new supportive homes at 7460 Hurd Street.

These homes will be deeply affordable studio apartments with support services. They will be offered to people who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness in Mission. Residents will be single adults of all genders, including seniors and people with disabilities. Priority is given to people in the local community.

A 2023 Point in Time count identified least 175 people experiencing homelessness in Mission. The actual number is likely higher, as the count does not include people who are couch surfing or living in vehicles and may also need housing. This project is an important part of our effort to address and prevent homelessness in the community.

Development

We originally announced this project August 2021. We later learned that this site needed extra environmental assessments due to its past automotive industry use. Construction began in May 2023, and we thank the community for their patience during this project delay.

We currently expect the homes to open in Spring 2024.

The City of Mission supports this location. It was chosen because it is close to health care services, transit and affordable shopping options.

This site was formerly Dr. H. G. Humes Park, named after a respected local physician and World War II veteran. Project partners have agreed to keep name of Dr. Humes associated with the property in some way.

Operations

Mission Community Services Society (MCSS) will operate the supportive housing and provide services to the residents. These will include:

  • 24/7 staffing
  • Daily meals
  • Referrals to health care and other community services
  • Access to skills training and employment assistance
  • Life skills training and activities through MCSS’s Engaged Community Guides program

Complex Care Housing

Up to 12 units in this building will offer Complex Care Housing services. Through this program, Fraser Health and MCSS will jointly offer person-centered health and social services to select residents.

Complex Care Housing provides individualized care and culturally safe services that can include primary health care, psychiatry, family and peer supports and more. This program gives many people an even better chance at successfully moving out of homelessness and into healthy, stable lives.

Learn more about Complex Care Housing.

About the Operator

Mission Community Services Society (MCSS) is a multi-service agency that has been providing shelter and programs to the community of Mission since 1972. They have extensive experience in the community, providing accessible services and opportunities to youth, families, seniors, newcomers to Canada and housing programs.

Below are a few examples of the impact MCSS-run supportive housing has had on residents:

Terry K came to our shelter with his partner after being displaced by a fire. He was later moved to our Supportive Housing program and had struggles to maintain housing due to a learning disability:

"I was able to get all of my ID back that was lost in the fire. I'm also able to have my girlfriend come visit me and have been reconnected with family who I haven't seen in 11 years."

Ernest W was living the gang life for years, fueled by problematic substance use. After deciding to change his life, Ernest feared a relapse into the only life he knew, but instead chose to live in Supportive Housing:

"I didn't have anywhere to go after treatment, and thought I'd end up back on the streets. Supportive Housing helped me build social supports and learn life skills after living most of my life on the streets."

Dawn P came to Supportive Housing with problematic alcohol use after staying in our Emergency Shelter. She had recently been evicted and was estranged from her family:

"While living in Supportive Housing I was able to stop using alcohol and got reconnected with my daughter. I'm now able to be the Grandma I always wanted to be and enjoy having my family over for visits in my new apartment."

Community Engagement

A caring community can contribute greatly to the success of people transitioning out of homelessness. BC Housing and MCSS are committed to being a good neighbour. We commit to keeping lines of communication open throughout this project, answering questions and addressing any concerns.

Community Engagement Fall 2021

BC Housing, the City of Mission and MCSS hosted two online community information sessions on September 13 and 14, 2021 so neighbours could learn more and ask questions about the project.

View the Community Information Session Presentation (pdf) and the Engagement Summary Report (pdf) from fall 2021.

BC Housing, the City of Mission and Fraser Health hosted an additional information on March 12, 2024. At this session, we shared the latest project updates and answered questions.

Community Engagement Spring 2024

View the Community Information Session Presentation (pdf) and the Engagement Summary Report (pdf) from March 2024.

Community Advisory Committee

We will set up a Community Advisory Committee (CAC) to help integrate the new housing and residents into the neighbourhood. This committee will have members from BC Housing, MCSS, the City of Mission, Fraser Health, other community partners as well as interested neighbours.

Neighbours can express interest in joining the CAC by emailing communityrelations@bchousing.org.

We also welcome any questions about this project by email to communityrelations@bchousing.org.


BC Housing and the City of Mission are working together to build 50 new supportive homes at 7460 Hurd Street.

These homes will be deeply affordable studio apartments with support services. They will be offered to people who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness in Mission. Residents will be single adults of all genders, including seniors and people with disabilities. Priority is given to people in the local community.

A 2023 Point in Time count identified least 175 people experiencing homelessness in Mission. The actual number is likely higher, as the count does not include people who are couch surfing or living in vehicles and may also need housing. This project is an important part of our effort to address and prevent homelessness in the community.

Development

We originally announced this project August 2021. We later learned that this site needed extra environmental assessments due to its past automotive industry use. Construction began in May 2023, and we thank the community for their patience during this project delay.

We currently expect the homes to open in Spring 2024.

The City of Mission supports this location. It was chosen because it is close to health care services, transit and affordable shopping options.

This site was formerly Dr. H. G. Humes Park, named after a respected local physician and World War II veteran. Project partners have agreed to keep name of Dr. Humes associated with the property in some way.

Operations

Mission Community Services Society (MCSS) will operate the supportive housing and provide services to the residents. These will include:

  • 24/7 staffing
  • Daily meals
  • Referrals to health care and other community services
  • Access to skills training and employment assistance
  • Life skills training and activities through MCSS’s Engaged Community Guides program

Complex Care Housing

Up to 12 units in this building will offer Complex Care Housing services. Through this program, Fraser Health and MCSS will jointly offer person-centered health and social services to select residents.

Complex Care Housing provides individualized care and culturally safe services that can include primary health care, psychiatry, family and peer supports and more. This program gives many people an even better chance at successfully moving out of homelessness and into healthy, stable lives.

Learn more about Complex Care Housing.

About the Operator

Mission Community Services Society (MCSS) is a multi-service agency that has been providing shelter and programs to the community of Mission since 1972. They have extensive experience in the community, providing accessible services and opportunities to youth, families, seniors, newcomers to Canada and housing programs.

Below are a few examples of the impact MCSS-run supportive housing has had on residents:

Terry K came to our shelter with his partner after being displaced by a fire. He was later moved to our Supportive Housing program and had struggles to maintain housing due to a learning disability:

"I was able to get all of my ID back that was lost in the fire. I'm also able to have my girlfriend come visit me and have been reconnected with family who I haven't seen in 11 years."

Ernest W was living the gang life for years, fueled by problematic substance use. After deciding to change his life, Ernest feared a relapse into the only life he knew, but instead chose to live in Supportive Housing:

"I didn't have anywhere to go after treatment, and thought I'd end up back on the streets. Supportive Housing helped me build social supports and learn life skills after living most of my life on the streets."

Dawn P came to Supportive Housing with problematic alcohol use after staying in our Emergency Shelter. She had recently been evicted and was estranged from her family:

"While living in Supportive Housing I was able to stop using alcohol and got reconnected with my daughter. I'm now able to be the Grandma I always wanted to be and enjoy having my family over for visits in my new apartment."

Community Engagement

A caring community can contribute greatly to the success of people transitioning out of homelessness. BC Housing and MCSS are committed to being a good neighbour. We commit to keeping lines of communication open throughout this project, answering questions and addressing any concerns.

Community Engagement Fall 2021

BC Housing, the City of Mission and MCSS hosted two online community information sessions on September 13 and 14, 2021 so neighbours could learn more and ask questions about the project.

View the Community Information Session Presentation (pdf) and the Engagement Summary Report (pdf) from fall 2021.

BC Housing, the City of Mission and Fraser Health hosted an additional information on March 12, 2024. At this session, we shared the latest project updates and answered questions.

Community Engagement Spring 2024

View the Community Information Session Presentation (pdf) and the Engagement Summary Report (pdf) from March 2024.

Community Advisory Committee

We will set up a Community Advisory Committee (CAC) to help integrate the new housing and residents into the neighbourhood. This committee will have members from BC Housing, MCSS, the City of Mission, Fraser Health, other community partners as well as interested neighbours.

Neighbours can express interest in joining the CAC by emailing communityrelations@bchousing.org.

We also welcome any questions about this project by email to communityrelations@bchousing.org.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Guidelines for constructive and respectful dialogue

  • Please ensure your question is clear, concise, relevant to the project, and respectful.
  • Review our moderation policy. Questions that do not abide by the moderation policy or guidelines for respectful dialogue may not be answered.
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  • Your question will appear once our team has answered it. If your question has already been answered, we may respond privately.
  • I have looked at the details provided for a low income housing project in Maple Ridge called Turnock Manor that BC Housing is funding. And I noticed that project will be part of the Crime Free Housing program. And I would like it if the supportive housing project going in on Hurd St was part of that program too. And if it can't be I would like to know why not. I noticed for the Turnock Manor project all tenants will have to sign a no smoking addendum and crime free addendum and the crime free contract agreement extends to guests as well. It seems more heavy handed than the good neighbor agreement you are having residents sign for the project going in on Hurd St. If it can be asked of tenants in a low income building I don't see why it can't be asked of tenants in a supportive housing project.

    Julia asked over 2 years ago

    Agreements are part of our operations and we work closely with the operator to develop them. As Hurd Street is still in its early phase, the discussions about resident services, resident agreements and programming have not yet been confirmed. The program agreements and good neighbour agreements that will be developed will address much of the same themes and be more aligned to meet the needs of supportive housing tenants. 

    In general, we do not see supportive housing programs signing onto an official “Crime Free Housing Program” for various reasons. Supportive housing (in most cases) uses a program agreement and not a residential tenancy agreement. Supportive housing is a housing first model with a focus on supporting tenants to maintain tenancies, and not create criteria for eviction. The staff training pieces offered by the Crime Free Housing program are useful in many circumstances, but these are often skills an experienced supportive housing operator may already have.  

  • What will you be doing to ensure our privacy for the people who have their backyards towards the park? Will there be some sort of fencing done? Will the windows of the units be facing our backyards? How will potential increase in theft and property damage be addressed? What will be the response time when issues do arise? Will BC Housing be responsive and actually help neighbours or will it all just be the same copy and paste answers we’ve been getting so far? What is being done to address the risks for our safety? What will you guys do to keep our neighborhood from turning into a tent city? We need our privacy promised, would you guys be open to building some sort of wall?

    Satvir Bhullar asked over 2 years ago

    Thank you for participating in our session and for your questions. 

    We are currently looking at multiple options for residents who are next to the new development. 

    Our Site plan drawing is preliminary in design and more drawings and renderings will be posted on BC Housing's Let’s Talk website as they are available.  

    For updates about this project, please check: https://letstalkhousingbc.ca/mission-hurd-street    

    Residents will be given a direct contact for the building and staff with be there 24/7. We will provide residents a Who to Call form, which gives the numbers of who to call and under what circumstances. These two items will mean comments, questions and concerns will be heard immediately.  

    To address the “tent city” concerns, supportive housing is self-contained studio apartments where supports for residents is available in the building. Residents will have their own units as this is not a shelter. 

  • After attending the first informational session today, I have few unanswered questions: 1. why was a wood build chosen as opposed to the shipping containers model, when we all know about the cost of construction lumber skyrocketing in the past few years?

    Zuzana Tyc asked over 2 years ago

    Thank you for participating in our session and your question. Modular housing is faster to construct thereby shortening the construction time and reducing disruption and noise to neighbours. Modular housing provides safe, individual units for shelter guests. This provides independence and can help residents progress to that next stage of housing. Examples of recent modular supportive housing can be seen with The Nest and at Guildford, both in Surrey.

  • When will the applications for this housing be available? Will there be couples housing available? How low barrier will this housing be? In this community we need housing that accepts people to come in when they are still using drugs or alcohol and support to go through the process of rehabilitation and wellness . I am hoping the rules will apply to folks still using .

    Becky Brisson asked over 2 years ago

    People who apply to live at the housing need to meet eligibility requirements around income, homelessness and required supports and programming. Residents are low-income individuals over the age of 19 who live in the community, have a history of homelessness and who need additional support services to maintain housing. Priority goes to people who are further along and either already on a path to recovery from drug or alcohol use or are ready to make a change in their lives and want help to do so. Youth will also be prioritized, and specific supports provided to help them thrive.  All residents will be provided support to assist with their successful tenancy, including daily meal services.  

    Priority will also be given to residents of Mission, including shelter, rough sleeping, various agency referrals as well as those who applied to BC Housing directly. We anticipate that the majority of residents living at Hurd Street will have been living successfully in BC Housing leased hotel rooms. 

  • Are we able to get a copy of all criminal history of the patrons on site?

    Shayne asked almost 3 years ago

    The offers of tenancy are made following meetings held by BC Housing’s coordinated access team where agencies representing MCSS, BC Housing, Fraser Health have assessed the applicants for suitability. Suitability considers vulnerability in the community, neighbourhood considerations, accessibility to services, the housing operators experience and mandates - all in the interest of creating a balanced mix tenancy that will support successful operation and tenancies. 

  • Will there be any compensation for residence in the area for cameras on their property and increased home security costs?

    Shayne asked almost 3 years ago

    BC Housing obtains funding to acquire and operate housing opportunities. We don’t have funding for private property improvements.

  • What are the specific qualifications of the person who will be at the facility 24/7 and how do we reach them to discuss security matters, drug use, garbage collection, and increased crime?

    Shayne asked almost 3 years ago

    Mission Community Services Society (MCSS) will be responsible for property and operations management. MCSS is an experienced non-profit charitable organization with over 40 years of experience and provides housing and support to families, adults, youth and seniors in the community. Learn more about the organization at https://missioncommunityservices.com  

    A minimum of two trained staff will be on-site 24 hours a day, seven days a week to manage the building and provide support to residents. During daytime hours several staff will be on hand, including an on-site supervisor, janitor, and supports from other partners providing specialized services. 

    MCSS will ensure that all staff have the appropriate training and skills necessary to support the clients. The training, as required by BC Housing, includes, but is not limited to crisis prevention training; First Aid/CPR; mental health first aid training; domestic violence and safety planning; substance use awareness and safety training; and trauma-informed training.

    Contact information will be made available when the site is developed.

  • I am concerned that we are losing more park space in an already park/amenity lacking area. Will there be additional parkland created to supplement? If not I am fully against this project.

    Dan asked almost 3 years ago

    The City recognizes this is a loss of parkland and are asking the community what improvements can be made to Kinsmen West park at 7th Ave and Hurd Street to help offset the loss of Dr. H.G. Humes park. 

    Ideas and suggestions for can be emailed to info@mission.ca

  • What will be the requirements for patrons to stay at this shelter? (Such as drug testing, maintaining the peace, length of stay, a “last call” of admittance each night etc). Currently the other housing in town - at Haven, allows drug taking to take place both on the property and outside. Patrons have consistently utilized the beds there, for years, without any rehabilitation or support to become independent and move on. There is no curfew as far as doors closing - and they’re allowed to come and go at all hours. This is not harm reduction. Harm reduction models (example: in site in vancouver) have criteria to be met. They are transition services that connect with other programs and services. Not only does this lack of harm reduction for current patrons not occur at haven, but with long term “residents” the capacity is met and people who may be newly affected by homelessness and need emergency shelter are turned away. The list goes on. So, my question is, if haven isn’t working - why are we creating more beds under the same broken system? Housing needs to have a real look at what’s happening in their accommodations in Mission as is - My hope is that if they saw the reality of it, they’d be mortified - enacting change and fund fixing what already exists, not wasting resources and money building more beds. Just because you’ve spent a lot of time (money) making a mistake - doesn’t mean you should maintain it.

    Monica asked almost 3 years ago

    BC Housing is partnering with the City of Mission and Mission Community Services Society to provide approximately 50 supportive modular homes for adults at risk or experiencing homelessness. Supportive housing is an opportunity for people to leave the streets and shelter system for safe and stable housing that will contribute to an improved quality of life. Supportive housing is a self-contained studio home with various support services provided on-site, to ensure people can achieve and maintain housing stability. Supports could include outreach workers, life skills training, employment assistance, connection and referral to community services and support groups. All residents would sign a program agreement (similar to a tenancy agreement) and would pay rent.   

    Supportive housing is for people experiencing or at risk of homelessness with varying health and personal challenges and needs. People experiencing homelessness are not a homogenous group and have had different pathways into homelessness. That’s why supportive housing tailors its response to clients, to help them maintain their housing and work on healing.  

    Residents sign a Program Agreement and are expected to abide by it. The Program Agreement addresses expectations about appropriate and respectful behavior especially as it relates to the health and safety of themselves and others. Staff works with residents and the neighbours to foster good neighbourhood relations.  Residents are expected to:   

    • Treat neighbours and community with consideration;
    • Not make excessive noise or cause unnecessary disturbances;
    • Ensure security doors are closed properly and not let any unknown persons into building;  
    • Put garbage in the appropriate bins;
    • Not smoke in the common areas, including the front entrance.

    MCSS may end an agreement at any time if a resident is:  

    • Engaging or behaving in a manner which is abusive and/or a threat to the mental or physical health or safety of anyone in the building/community;
    • Significantly disrupting the quiet enjoyment of other participants and/or neighbours; and  
    • Engaging in willful vandalism or damage to the building or property.


    BC Housing and MCSS are committed to be good neighbours and to provide a safe community both inside and outside of the new housing. Supportive housing is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week, by an experienced non-profit operator. MCSS works closely with the RCMP, Bylaws, Fraser Health, BC Housing and other community agencies to ensure the community is safe for all to enjoy.  As per regular practice, they will create a Community Advisory Committee that includes neighbours, to discuss emergent and ongoing issues towards building a safer and healthier community.   

    A BC Housing 2019 study (Modular Supportive Housing Resident Outcomes Study: Results for First Seven Modular Supportive Housing Developments) reported that 82% of survey respondents across seven modular supportive housing sites reported experiencing positive interactions with neighbours in the surrounding community since they moved in.

    We hope that this information is useful.  

  • Why is this community plan being built adjacent to a daycare? The vulnerable people can have visual access to children playing outdoors. They can access my property at any time of the day.

    Giggleberries Early Education Centre asked almost 3 years ago

    Supportive housing locations are determined based on proximity to services, amenities and availability of property. Housing for people experiencing and at risk of homelessness needs to meet people where they are at, providing connection to the resources that people need to work towards living a healthy, stable life. Access to community services and transit is key for people without homes, but so is feeling part of a neighbourhood. With a remote site, there is no access to services, no regular transit access, and no integration with the community, which is essential for people who are working towards a healthy, stable life.   

    BC Housing worked with the City of Mission over the last several years to identify a site for this much needed housing in Mission. The City and BC Housing acknowledge the need for supportive housing in Mission, and after monitoring and conducting usage studies on the park, decided to use this City owned, appropriately zoned property for the supportive housing. After evaluating several properties in Mission over the last four years, this property was chosen because it best suits the location for such a facility.

    BC Housing and the housing operator, Mission Community Services Society (MSCC) are committed to being good neighbours and to provide a safe community both inside and outside of the new housing. Supportive housing is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week, by an experienced non-profit operator. All residents sign a program agreement in respect to expectations around behaviours.   

    MCSS (https://missioncommunityservices.com) works closely with the RCMP, Bylaws, Fraser Health, BC Housing and other community agencies to ensure the community is safe for all to enjoy. As per regular practice, they will create a Community Advisory Committee that includes neighbours, to discuss emergent and ongoing issues towards building a safer and healthier community.  

    Other security measures include: safety and security monitoring within the building; optimized lighting around the building, security cameras, fob-access only to the building, and a staffed reception area. 

Page last updated: 26 Mar 2024, 10:25 AM