Let's Talk Supportive Housing in Nanaimo


Thank you to everyone who participated in our first-ever online Q&A on November 22nd. If you missed it, you can watch the video above, and also read through the questions and answers below.

We are also hosting eight Community Dialogue Sessions from November 21-29 learn more here.

In response to an urgent need for more affordable housing for people experiencing and at risk of homelessness in Nanaimo, BC Housing is developing supportive housing at two sites in the community. The objective is to have this housing available by late November 2018.

This temporary housing will provide a home for


Thank you to everyone who participated in our first-ever online Q&A on November 22nd. If you missed it, you can watch the video above, and also read through the questions and answers below.

We are also hosting eight Community Dialogue Sessions from November 21-29 learn more here.

In response to an urgent need for more affordable housing for people experiencing and at risk of homelessness in Nanaimo, BC Housing is developing supportive housing at two sites in the community. The objective is to have this housing available by late November 2018.

This temporary housing will provide a home for people, as well as full-time staffing to support residents through access to meals on site, connection to medical services, and life skills programming. The goal is to help people achieve and maintain housing stability.

2020 Labieux Road and 250 Terminal Avenue N.

BC Housing has leased land from the City of Nanaimo at 2020 Labieux Road to install approximately 90 units of interim supportive housing, which will be operated by Pacifica Housing Advisory Association.

We have also purchased a property at 250 Terminal Avenue N and will install approximately 80 units of interim supportive housing. Newcastle Place will be operated by Island Crisis Care Society (ICCS).

Non-profit operator responsibilities for both properties includes property management, community liaison, and resident selection. Once residents move in, staff will be on-site around the clock seven days a week to provide support.

People who will be housed at these developments will be from Nanaimo or the surrounding area, be over the age of 19 and meet eligibility requirements regarding income, homelessness, and required supports and programming.

The 2018 Point in Time Homeless Count found 335 homeless individuals living in Nanaimo.

CLOSED: Thank you for participating, this discussion has concluded.

  • Has Island Crisis Society ever managed a supportive housing facility before?

    Pothead asked 19 days ago

    Island Crisis Care Society has managed Samaritan House, which includes supportive housing and transitional housing, in Nanaimo since 2007.


  • How much in dollars/year is the contract worth to each of these two non profits?

    Dick asked 25 days ago

    For the 4 building site at 2020 Labieux, operated by Pacifica Housing Advisory Association, BC Housing has allocated 2.1M per year in operational funding.

    For the 3 building site at 250 Terminal Avenue N, operated by Island Crisis Care Society, BC Housing has allocated 1.5M per year in operational funding. 

  • Dean Fortin stated on Nov 23 in the Nanaimo News Bulletin that the Pacifica Uplands Walk project has not resulted in creased crime. Please confirm this statement with actual statistics or any other reports published by independent 3rd party groups. I understand that VI Reginal Library has fenced in the office in an effort to reduce criminal activity and has also installed security cameras and hired security guards for certain parts of the day. Also understand that some folks from a nearby condo pick up needles and other related items in the area on a regular basis. Could it be that the number of files opened for criminal incidents has not increased but the number of suspicious criminal activities has increased ? I understand that one cannot assume that increased suspicious activity is a result of the Pacifica Uplands wet house.

    William asked 22 days ago

    Uplands Drive is a permanent supportive housing development with 33 homes with supports for people experiencing homelessness in Nanaimo. It has been open since 2015, operated by Pacifica Housing Advisory. Any challenges related to the housing and its residents that have arisen have been addressed by the operator in a responsive and professional manner. Please see the Supported Housing Neighbourhood Impact Assessment report  for more information.

    Lessons are continually being learned about how to ensure the success of supportive housing and its residents, staff and the community. BC Housing is committed to be a good neighbour. 

  • MR Flanagan . You stated recently regarding current housing projects , { Uplands Walk] as being successful and no crime increase . I challenge you to refute that statement as it is totally incorrect ! There is constant police presence at this address , and these numbers can be had if you did the actual investigating . The garbage , frequent increase of foot traffic and theft increased from day 1 at this address , and the neighboring properties will also provide you accurate statements to this. They also had to install fencing surrounding this area to prevent the constant trespassing and theft . If you are going on record to state current housing status , you better have your facts straight!

    boats asked 24 days ago

    Uplands Drive is a permanent supportive housing development with 33 homes with supports for people experiencing homelessness in Nanaimo. It has been open since 2015, operated by Pacifica Housing Advisory. Any challenges related to the housing and its residents that have arisen have been addressed by the operator in a responsive and professional manner. Please see the Supported Housing Neighbourhood Impact Assessment report  for more information. Lessons are continually being learned about how to ensure the success of supportive housing and its residents, staff and the community. BC Housing is committed to be a good neighbour.

  • Why are you hiding the view of the housing on terminal ave with a high fence/boards?

    lynda asked 25 days ago

    250 Terminal Avenue N is an active construction site and has been fenced properly for the safety and security of those working on-site and the surrounding neighbourhood. The fencing was also a direct request from City of Nanaimo Planning Department.


  • What requirements are need to be on a community liaison committee? Will these committees have publicly available minutes of each meeting?

    Dick asked 25 days ago

    The Community Advisory Committee will accept applications from the local community, with preference given to those are willing to commit to the Committee Terms of Reference and required time commitment; have experience representing their community on other committee/boards; and who live/work within a five-block radius of the housing site. Meeting notes will be distributed to all committee members. 


  • Are you going to provide additional security for Bowen Park to address issues that will arise due to drug use?

    George asked 26 days ago

    Both sites will have security for the perimeter of  the housing, for the initial launch to ensure operations run smoothly. The security of the surrounding area will continue to be monitored by Nanaimo Parks and Recreation and bylaw officers.

  • As 250 Terminal Avenue North is a response to emergency housing due to extreme weather (thereby foregoing all zoning regulations, public consult and due process), I would like BC Housing and ICCS to consider limited visitors and time restricted access to and from the site by all tenants. If and when BC Housing is approved to build 'homes' on a properly zoned and conforming site, then these rules would not apply. But as this has not gone through a proper rezoning, and the community has not had a voice, I feel that there should be restrictions to lessen the impact on the surrounding neighbours (noise, vehicle traffic, lights, increased activity). I realize that you want to create a positive experience while transition people from street to home and make them feel at home, and I appreciate that, but there should be a mutual consideration for the neighbourhood transitioning in to a much denser and diverse population without consult. This is a temporary emergency response, not home. It is not home until a permanent site is approved and built. Having said that, is it possible to limit the hours of access as well as the numbers and hours of visitors? I am certain many of your tenants would appreciate the rules as well, or at least respect them.

    van ave asked 21 days ago

    Residents are no more subject to a curfew than anyone else living in the community. Their tenancy is as long as they comply with guidelines and behaviours agreed to before moving in. 
    All visitors must sign in at front desk and security is present onsite 24/7.

  • I know a few homelss people who sleep around the rugby club in the woods,etc. Could they be eligible for the housing and how do they apply?

    Don asked 20 days ago

    BC Housing works with non-profit partners across the province to provide services for those at risk of or experiencing homelessness. These include a Homeless Outreach Program, Drop-in Centres, the shelter program and supportive housing. For more information, please visit our website: https://www.bchousing.org/housing-assistance/homelessness-services

  • How many homeless applications for these 170 units were from outside of Nanaimo tent city? We’re all 323 homeless people in Nanaimo encourages to apply for these units or just tent city residents?

    Pothead asked 19 days ago

    All residents have been identified as having experienced homelessness in the Nanaimo region, a recent Point In Time report identified sixty-three per cent as having experienced homelessness for more than five years. Residents have been assessed for suitability for supportive housing through a multi-agency allocation committee who made recommendations

  • How long do you expect the Labieux Rd.site to be operating.

    George asked 25 days ago

    As these are temporary structures, the commitment by BC Housing is a 2-5 year process and we will be working with the City.

    Two to five years is about how long it will take to work with the community, identify sites, then go through the process of zoning and construction.


  • Why were zoning rules overruled to allow this type of housing?

    Greg asked 25 days ago

    There was an urgent need that we get housing open by November/ early December to address the closing of the tent city and homelessness in Nanaimo.  We are conscious we need people to move inside before extreme weather. This housing will be temporary: any permanent housing will have to go through the City of Nanaimo process for zoning.


  • Has the city identified any sites that will be put forward to replace the Labieux Rd. site at this time.

    George asked 25 days ago

    The City of Nanaimo is in the process of identifying possible sites and will work with the community to do so.

  • So, temporary housing @Newcastle Place can take 2-5 years before permanent affordable housing will be built? Thank you for the information

    haveagoodnight asked 25 days ago

    You are most welcome. Thank you for your interest.

  • I’m very excited about the new supportive housing coming into Nanaimo. This type of housing is a progessive step towards helping those who are experiencing homelessness, for whatever reason, and helps to restore dignity to someone who may be struggling with accessing daily basics (food, showers, comfort). As a community member, how can I be more involved?

    Lisa asked 25 days ago

    Welcome packages are being done through Go Fund Me page organized by Friends of 250 for both sites. 

    There are also opportunities for welcoming and you can contact Pacifica Housing and Island Crisis Care Society directly to learn more. Many groups have come forward to help trhey may be able to put you in touch with. 

    Christmas is coming, it’s a time for second chances. There are good people in the city of Nanaimo. Thank you


  • How will you protect these housing patrons from accidents on Terminal Ave. That is an enormously busy road. If these people are on drugs or suicidal, who will be there to prevent them getting run over?

    Rich asked 25 days ago

    There is a very thorough application process to choose who will be moving into the housing. 

    Agents like Island Health review the applications to choose the most vulnerable. We want to create a healthy community and balance of people within the buildings.


  • Why do you not have a curfew set for those who will be living in these two sites and how will you protect those residents living around terminal ave to make sure the homeless do not do drugs or damage to properties around? PlEASE SPEAK LOUDER

    lynda asked 25 days ago

    There will not be curfews. This is independent living and  these are people’s homes, not jails but homes like any other apartment. We must reiterate that this is their home, they choose to be part of the home and they are committed to making this work. Also recognize many are earning income by working. 

  • When are people going to STOP treating and assuming all homeless people are criminals? I'm homeless, I volunteer at 3 well known organizations, I don't tell people I am homeless, because if I did I would get the ridiculous judgement like these questions below imply. Housing will never be affordable for me until people stop stereotyping homeless people and be more accepting, hence vacancies will increase and cost will decrease. When is that going to be addressed? When will the rich start having some compassion for the poor? I am, as a human, no different than you.

    Jacquie asked 25 days ago

    Thank you for your honesty. 

  • Other cities have started tiny home (200-400sq') villages to provide temporary housing for people along with other health and employment services. This gives people a safe spot to " just be" while they are getting their life on track to care for themselves. Easy to manufacture and mobile so can be moved when needed. Has Nanaimo considered this?

    asked 25 days ago

    There are no applications for tiny homes at this time, however the City of Nanaimo has made a conscious effort to reduce barriers to affordable housing (allowing duplexes and secondary suites, and remove minimum size).

    Someone could make application to make small unit development under existing rules.


  • What proof is required to claim that the clients are Nanaimo residents?

    Dick asked 25 days ago

    A team has been working for a long time and actually know many of the clients and where they have been living. 63% in the Point In Time Count have been living in Nanaimo for over 5 years. In other communities when we talk about homeless, they have been living in the community for a long time and are “chronic homeless”  - over a year. 

  • Supposedly the site on terminal ave will be temporary but yet I read elsewhere it will be permanent so which is correct and how long will you allow them to live there and will there be 24 hours security on site?

    Linda asked 30 days ago

    The long term plan is to replace the temporary housing at 250 Terminal with permanent supportive housing. The permanent supportive housing would be subject to the municipal approval process.

  • What are the principles that inform the framework of your policies on housing for British Columbians

    Nanaimo resident asked 27 days ago

    Please visit our About page to learn more about BC Housing's mandate, mission, vision and values.

    About BC Housing

  • How much is the rent in the supportive housing units? $200 should cover the costs according to the chart on "average monthly cost of supporting someone while homeless"

    CraigT asked 25 days ago

    Tenants will be paying rent at the social assistance rate. Not all will be unemployed: some people in the tent city are working. There will be some Veterans on pensions, someseniors getting OAP. These are individuals that need assistance. 

    People who are homeless are not a homogenous group: there is a range of reasons why people become homeless – lack of affordable rental, trauma, mental or physical health issues or a combination of those factors. This housing can address those issues; help people access employment, connect with family and maybe go back to school.


  • Why did you not allow neighbours to vote on this before going ahead with these projects since we have good reasons to be worried after what has happened at the tent city?I moved out from downtown lately so do not want issues in my new area by terminal ave.

    Linda asked 30 days ago

    There is an urgent need that we get housing open by November/ early December. We are conscious we need people to move inside before extreme weather. This housing will be temporary: any permanent housing would have to go through the City of Nanaimo process for zoning etc.


  • you mentioned there will be litter clean ups will that be daily and how many will be going around and how many blocks will they do?

    lynda asked 25 days ago

    There will not be large shifts of people doing cleanup but committees will be put together with neighbours, RCMP, community to ensure it is a safe and clean environment and residents will be picking up garbage and trying to keep their neighbourhood clean. 

    We recognize that we are moving in 80 or 90 people and as they get settled and integrated and used to where they are living, it will be some time to normalize. Ultimately it’s important to us for residents to have the opportunity to relearn self worth and care for their neighbourhood. Working with social workers to clean up is part of the process: 

  • Who did the homeless survey and did they not have a vested interest in the count?

    Dick asked 25 days ago

    The Point In Time Count is available Point in Time Count 2018 

    The nationally coordinated 2018 PiT Count was funded through the Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) and involved the collaboration of over 60 HPS-funded communities across Canada. The Nanaimo Homelessness Coalition, Nanaimo Region John Howard Society (NRJHS), and United Way Central and Northern Vancouver Island (UWCNVI) organized the second consecutive HPS PiT Count in Nanaimo. The count was held on April 18th, 2018.

  • Hello. What exactly does the “agreement” state that tenants sign and how long exactly is the term of tenancy.

    Kristian asked about 1 month ago

    The term of tenancy is however long they choose so long as they comply with safe behaviours and guidelines. They agree to pay rent and have rights and responsibilities which is a key part of the program.

    We have some residents in supportive housing who are back on their feet after a few months and looking for rental housing; other residents need to be there and supported indefinitely (for example, one client with brain injury will be there indefinitely and is blooming with the supportive environment). 



  • It is a known fact that crime rates have risen around the areas where the homeless people are gathering. What are the practical steps that you are going to take to solve this problem?

    Tarek asked 24 days ago

    We looked at crime around the Pacifica run facility at Uplands and there was no increase in crime. 

    The Community Advisory Committee will have RCMP as a key partner working on policing issues. 

    We all need to feel safe; homeless people need to feel safe as well as they are often victims of attacks.


  • How many individual units will there be at the terminal ave site and where did they come from?

    lynda asked 25 days ago

    Newcastle Place (at 250 Terminal Avenue North) will consist of 80 units of re-purposed housing from mining camps.

  • why is it that the residents of cranberry area had the city back out of it's plan to put the temporary housing there by their protesting and yet you have forced this upon the neighbors of both sites without listening to them. Why not ask nanaimo residents to suggest sites where it would be more appropriate and allow them to become part of the solution You may be surprised at what working with people before making decisions may bring to the table and give them a sense of being involved

    feeling put upon asked 25 days ago

    Cranberry site was a piece of property owned by the City of Nanaimo and identified as a potential location for permanent housing. At the end of that time, the council decided not to pursue housing there. When we come to permanent housing, we will need to identify sites and work with the community to do so. 

  • Will the residents of these taxpayer funded accommodations be allowed to have individual or group marijuana grow ops in these accomadtions?

    Dick asked 25 days ago

    Residents cannot grow marijuana in their rooms: the rooms are very small, not practical. 


  • Will people with criminal records, house arrest or on probation be allow in as a client of these temporary accommodations?

    Dick asked 25 days ago

    We cannot discriminate on any basis, including criminal records. Our goal will be to work with probation officers to help people succeed. If they serve their time, and are released, our goal is to help people to reintegrate into the community. 

    We will be working with outreach people as a team to be sure we have a good mix in the buildings, not all high needs and BC Housing works with correction services. 

  • Will it be more men than women moving into the newcastle housing if so how many?

    lynda asked 25 days ago

    There are more women than men. We have one building of 22 units set aside for women as we recognize that some of the women are particularly vulnerable, which we identified during our work in the tent city.


  • Why choose a site so close to Beban Park, Naniamo's busiest park with several children's activities on going.

    George asked 25 days ago

    As we move closer to closure of tent city people would be moving into downtown or into parks which were already under strain from those living in parks. 

    What was a downtown issue has become a city issue. Courts say people are allowed to camp in parks, we wanted to be sure that we weren’t pushing people to the parks. The City of Nanaimo is not land rich and wanted to keep what limited lands they have available for housing, and to put temporary housing where it’s better suited. Labieux is part of city works, but in the short term can be used as a temporary solution for housing.

  • Besides create and maintaining your employment what will be the benchmark for success? Will these benchmarks be publicly available and when?

    Dick asked 25 days ago

    Stability is key. Our goal is to stabilize folks, help them stay in their houses. The operator reports on stability and tenancy as people stay six months and 12 months. 

    People who are stabilized don’t need to stay in social housing, and we can help them move on. On annual basis we do assessment and survey and report that out: greater access to health services means 30-40% are actively engaged in work. Ongoing dialogue with community helps to know what’s working on a day to day level as well.

    We have just released studies on social value of supported and affordable housing, available in our document library at LetsTalkHousingBC.ca


  • Please add the names of the people on the panel tonight with their title & contact information.

    Richard asked 25 days ago

    On the November 22nd live stream panel were, from left to right:

    ·  Host: Diana Bulley

    ·  BC Housing: Dominic Flanagan, Executive Director, Strategic Advisor on Homelessness

    ·  Pacifica Housing: Dean Fortin, Executive Director

    ·  Island Crisis Care Society (ICCS): Violet Hayes, Executive Director

    ·  BC Housing: Heidi Hartman, Regional Director, Vancouver Island, BC Housing

    ·  Island Health: Lisa Murphy

    ·  City of Nanaimo: Dale Lindsay, Director of Planning


  • How does housing that is not near grocery stores and is isolated help anyone? Or housing not near Transit Services help anyone? Housing needs to have access to Services such as Counseling and Peer Support along with Personal and Professional Development. Just because you’re homeless it not the end you can rise out of it with Access to Community Supports

    Annmarie asked about 1 month ago

    We will be providing meals, breakfast, housing and outreach workers will be able to help with transportation with lots of resources coming in to the housing.


  • What will you do to try to prevent these people once they are out in the neighbourhoods from maybe causing issues like trespassing,doing drugs,littering,stealing because I know that was a big problem when I lived near downtown?

    Linda asked 30 days ago

    Committees will be put together with neighbours, RCMP, and community members to ensure it is a safe environment. Tenants will be picking up garbage and trying to keep their neighbourhood clean. 

    It’s not going to be perfect, but individual tenants will be able to gain work experience to be part of clean teams working in the community. 

    BC Housing has developed thousands of units across the province and we have research (Community Acceptance series and SOcial Return on Investment series) about other city’s issues and about community crime, drug use. In communities we looked at, those communities accept the housing and support it.

    We recognize some of the concern around drug use: individuals can choose to use in their own home (rather than out in public).


    The overviews for both these series can be found in the LetsTalkHousingBC.ca Document Library,or on our website:

    Overview of Strategies from Case Studies of Supportive Housing Sites in BC

    SROI Analysis: The Social and Economic Value of Dedicated-Site Supportive Housing in B.C.


  • Why are they moving forward with the 250 Terminal site when there is a court challenge? Lawsuit filed in the BC Supreme Court.

    Richard asked 25 days ago

    We have an urgent need to address and our legal advice is to go ahead. It’s important (due to winter coming) we bring people inside as soon as possible.


  • There are some people that have pets that play an important role in their lives. Does having a pet create a barrier for entry to the temporary housing?

    Shadow asked 25 days ago

    Pets will be welcomed. There will be some limits as we can’t have everyone having a pet. We will ensure pets are taken care of, we recognize the benefits of pets toward mental health: the pet may be the only friend they have when they have suffered so many losses. With limits on dog and cat size we want to provide support.


  • What is going to be done when the residents begin to shoot up at the playground, the field, and the forest? Will there be someone monitoring where residents go or will there be someone who walks throughout the beban complex area to ensure that the families aren't having to watch out for needles or people passed out on a possible daily basis? How temporary is this housing suppose to be? And what about ensuring that the residents don't harass the women and children at haven house up the road? These people are fleeing from abusive situations and don't need to be dealing with aggressive addicts. As well, will some of the future housing be dry? For recovering addicts living with active ones doesn't seem to be healthy

    Alex asked 27 days ago

    It is important to understand that the units under development will mean a home for each person who lives there. There should be no reason for anyone to loiter outside - they will have access to their own rooms, common indoor and outdoor amenity space.

    BC Housing takes a harm reduction approach, which means staff is available to support any residents who are in various phases of substance use. Statistics show that many people who die from overdoses do so when they are alone, and so the building will be set up with the ability to provide a safe consumption space for residents only, to ensure the safety of residents who are active substance users. As part of the program, residents make their own choices in regard to lifestyle and are supported in efforts to work on their health and well-being. Giving people stable housing and access to supports will keep them off the street. Both staff and residents will be committed to keeping the property and neighborhood maintained with a daily clean-up, just as any other resident in the neighborhood.

    The housing will be in place until permanent options are in place in Nanaimo.

    BC Housing and the non-profit operators are working with local organizations to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports live in the housing. Every potential resident would be considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services. We want all residents to be successful.

    Once the housing is open, neighbours will be given a direct contact for the building for any related concerns. For concerns unrelated to residents or building, people can call the RCMP non-emergency line or Bylaw staff.

    A community advisory committee will also be created to discuss any emergent and ongoing issues towards building a safer and healthier community, with representation that may include BC Housing, Vancouver Island Health Authority, the City of Nanaimo, local RCMP, local service providers and community members at large.


  • What protection does the city of Nanaimo offer that the local residents will not have increased theft on their properties? My car has been broken into and valuable property stolen from within the car. Our neighbors lawn furniture was also stolen...other neighbors have had theft and break-ins on their properties. This break-ins are on Brandon Way off of Labeuix...

    Dwight asked 26 days ago

    BC Housing cannot speak on behalf of the City of Nanaimo. However, it sounds like the area is experiencing some concerns around crime, and opening a building that will be staffed 24 hours per day, seven days a week, is likely to have a positive impact. Our experience is that people in supportive housing take pride in their homes and are as interested in a safe community as other neighbours.

    A community advisory committee will be created to discuss any emergent and ongoing issues towards building a safer and healthier community, with representation that may include BC Housing, Vancouver Island Health Authority, the City of Nanaimo, local RCMP, local service providers and community members at large.

  • Is this housing part of a continuum of care where those housed will be connected to establish treatment, both for profit treatment, and treatment provided by NGO’s? If so, what efforts will be put in place to support those under treatment from those housed who at this point chosen not to seek treatment.

    Rick Hyne asked 28 days ago

    BC Housing and the non-profit operators are working with local organizations to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports live in the housing. Every potential resident would be considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services. We want all residents to be successful.

    It’s important to note that not all homeless people have addictions and not all people with addictions are homeless. A recent study shows that 80% of people with mental health and addiction issues developed these issues after becoming homeless, not before becoming homeless. It is also proven that health is compromised the longer a person lives on the street.

    We anticipate that not all residents would have substance abuse issues, but all residents will have the opportunity to move forward with their lives. The approach for the housing is Housing First. Our experience is that having a home reduces mental health and addiction issues. People are better able to move forward with their lives if they are first housed. Housing is provided first and then supports are provided including physical and mental health, education, employment, substance abuse and community connections. We want to work with people on their issues, but it difficult to do this until they have a home. If we leave them on the streets, nothing will change for them or the community.

    When people are ready to move into independent housing, staff will assist with securing housing and liaising with landlords to support stable tenancies. 50 new rent supplements for the private market will be available in Nanaimo. BC Housing is working on a number of  new affordable housing options for Nanaimo. 

  • This development was introduced as temporary supportive housing. Now articles in media strongly suggest 250 Terminal Ave. will become a permanent development. All this with zero input from residents. What assurances do you have this 250 Terminal structure will be strictly temporary and why is the press saying otherwise, all without due process please.

    Rich asked 27 days ago

    The interim housing being placed at 250 Terminal Avenue N will not be permanent. However, there are plans to build permanent housing on the site at a future date. BC Housing will work with the City of Nanaimo on any proposal for permanent housing. 

  • I understand looking after our own homeless but why is Nanaimo being forced to deal with everyone from anywhere that roll into town and claim to be homeless. And why are the tax payers of Nanimo being forced to foot the bill?/

    ian asked 29 days ago

    The new temporary supportive housing is for residents of Nanaimo who are experiencing homelessness. The June 2018 Point in Time Count found that 81% of people experiencing homelessness have lived in Nanaimo for more than one year and 63% have lived in Nanaimo for over five years. The application for housing at Newcastle Place and 2020 Labieux considers income, homelessness, required supports and programming. Priority will be given to eligible people residing in the 1 Port Drive encampment.

    Housing a person costs less than leaving them on the street.


  • Why was there NO communication or discussion with neighbours before either of these housing initiatives were put in place?

    anonymouse asked 30 days ago

    In a crisis situation, every day counts. The interim supportive housing will address an urgent need in the community, during the coldest time of the year. Any plans for permanent supportive housing will go through the municipal review process, as like any other development proposal.

    A community advisory committee will be created to discuss any emergent and ongoing issues towards building a safer and healthier community, with representation that may include BC Housing, Vancouver Island Health Authority, the City of Nanaimo, local RCMP, local service providers and community members at large.

  • I have two questions. First, since the plan to house homeless people in mobile bunkhouses on a city works lot on Labieux will be non-conforming, just how temporary will it be? And second, as I heard there will be staffing at these sites, will the staff be monitoring how the new residents co-habitate in the area? Even though former mayor Bill McKay thinks there are no neighbours to that land, my family and hundreds more live just across the highway in the heavily-populated Country Club and Lynburn subdivisions, and we are concerned about our property in light of reports of increased crime near homeless camps.

    Stephen asked about 1 month ago

    This site is an interim solution while BC Housing and the City of Nanaimo continue to work together to identify  more opportunities to increase the supply of supportive and affordable housing in Nanaimo.

    BC Housing and the Pacifica Housing Advisory Committee will prioritize safety for the residents, the staff, and the surrounding community. We want to ensure that people are successful at maintaining housing stability. The housing will have a minimum of three staff available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to ensure that residents are supported and that any concerns are addressed in a timely manner. A community advisory committee will be created to discuss any emergent and ongoing issues towards building a safer and healthier community, with representation that may include BC Housing, Vancouver Island Health Authority, the City of Nanaimo, local RCMP, local service providers and community members at large.

    Experience has shown that residents of supportive housing take great pride in their new homes and actively work to build a sense of community in their neighbourhood. 

  • How is it determined who will be getting the accommodation? Will people that have medical disabilities and need safe accommodation away from those with addiction be given separate residences? Otherwise the people with disability requiring more financial support will now be living and exposed in proxomity to those with serious mental or addiction issues? What have you done or doing to accommodate the seniors and disability just requiring a home? What about the local homeless around Country Club Labieux area but not from tent city. Not hardcore. Do not steal, drugs etc. Are their needs part of this? Will they receive housing??

    JanetDeidr asked 29 days ago

    All residents who move into the interim housing with supports have completed Supportive  Housing Applications, and are considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance and help with accessing a range of social and health care services.  BC Housing and the non-profit operators are working with local organizations to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports live in the housing. We want the residents to be successful at achieving and maintaining housing stability. All person experiencing homelessness who meets the eligibility requirements will be considered for this housing. 
    Seniors and people with disabilities who are in need of a home, but do not need additional supports, who not qualify for this interim supportive housing. They can learn more about subsidized housing options at www.bchousing.org/housing-assistance/rental-housing 
    BC Housing and the City continue to work together to identify more opportunities to increase the supply of supportive and affordable housing in Nanaimo.

  • I think if you have a curfew for these homeless that may make neighbours feel more safe so can you consider it? I think they should be home no later than 8:30pm.There are many apartment buildings within 2 blocks from that site with a few seniors so that is part of the reason I worry about having some homeless who are addicts and thieves.

    Linda asked 30 days ago

    BC Housing and our operators, Pacifica and ICCS are committed to be a good neighbour. We agree that residents need to be respectful. Each person living at the interim housing sites will sign a Program Agreement and will be expected to abide by it. The Program Agreement will address expectations about appropriate and respectful behavior especially as it relates to the health and safety of themselves and others. Staff will work with residents and the neighbours to foster good neighbourhood relations. Residents are expected to:
    • Treat neighbours and community with consideration;
    • Not make excessive noise or cause unnecessary disturbances;
    • Ensuring security doors are closed properly and not letting any unknown persons into building;
    • Put garbage in the appropriate bins;
    • Clean up after pets;
    • Not smoke in the common areas, including the front entrance.
    The non-profit operator may end an agreement at any time if a resident is:
    • Engaging or behaving in a manner which is abusive and/or a threat to the mental or physical health or safety of anyone in the building/community;
    • Significantly disrupting the quiet enjoyment of other participants and/or neighbours; and
    • Engaging in willful vandalism or damage to the building or property.

  • Hello. How many “permanent” full time staff will there be, what are their roles and what will their salaries be?

    Kristian asked about 1 month ago

    The housing will have a minimum of three staff available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to ensure that residents are supported and that any concerns are addressed in the timely manner. Staffing will include a manager, cooks, property maintenance and support workers, and programming staff. There will be enough staff to ensure that the housing is successful. 
    Pacifica and ICCS will ensure that all staff will have the appropriate training and skills necessary to support the clients. The required training, as required by BC Housing, includes, but is not limited to:
    • Crisis prevention training;
    • First Aid/CPR;
    • Mental health first aid training;
    • Domestic violence and safety planning;
    • Substance use awareness and safety training; and
    • Trauma-informed training.
    Staff salaries vary by organization and are determined by role and experience