District of North Vancouver, Supportive Housing – 1577 Lloyd Ave.

Illustrative rendering of multi-unit building.


The District of North Vancouver’s 2018 Rental and Affordable Housing Strategy has identified that homelessness is on the rise in North Vancouver, and that women and children are increasingly vulnerable.

BC Housing is partnering with the District of North Vancouver (DNV) and RainCity Housing on a proposal to address the crucial need for supportive housing in North Vancouver.

Project Details

A permanent supportive housing project for single women and women-led families has been earmarked for the district-owned site at the corner of Lloyd Avenue and West 16th Street.

The proposal is to construct a five storey, 60-unit building that provides homes for single women and women-led families who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness.

District staff are leading the rezoning process and BC Housing will be the funder. For more information on the rezoning process please visit http://DNV.org/west16th.

If approved, RainCity Housing would operate the housing, with staff on site 24/7 to provide supports, including meal programs, life and employment skills training, as well as health and wellness support services. Learn more about the organization at http://www.raincityhousing.org/.

Community Engagement

To ensure that everyone has an opportunity to learn more, ask questions and provide feedback about this proposal before the public hearing, we held four small group neighbourhood dialogues and two webinars between February 11th and March 11th, 2021. All feedback received before noon on Friday, March 26, 2021 will be included in a summary report that will be submitted to the District as part of the rezoning process.

The Public Hearing closed on 31 March 2021 and District Council may not receive new information following the close of the Public Hearing. Questions and comments can still be directed to BC Housing, RainCity Housing and District of North Vancouver staff during this time.

To find out more information about the proposal, please view a recording of the online information session held on February 23, below:


Your feedback and comments are important to us

We welcome questions and comments below in the Q&A tool or by email to communityrelations@bchousing.org.


The District of North Vancouver’s 2018 Rental and Affordable Housing Strategy has identified that homelessness is on the rise in North Vancouver, and that women and children are increasingly vulnerable.

BC Housing is partnering with the District of North Vancouver (DNV) and RainCity Housing on a proposal to address the crucial need for supportive housing in North Vancouver.

Project Details

A permanent supportive housing project for single women and women-led families has been earmarked for the district-owned site at the corner of Lloyd Avenue and West 16th Street.

The proposal is to construct a five storey, 60-unit building that provides homes for single women and women-led families who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness.

District staff are leading the rezoning process and BC Housing will be the funder. For more information on the rezoning process please visit http://DNV.org/west16th.

If approved, RainCity Housing would operate the housing, with staff on site 24/7 to provide supports, including meal programs, life and employment skills training, as well as health and wellness support services. Learn more about the organization at http://www.raincityhousing.org/.

Community Engagement

To ensure that everyone has an opportunity to learn more, ask questions and provide feedback about this proposal before the public hearing, we held four small group neighbourhood dialogues and two webinars between February 11th and March 11th, 2021. All feedback received before noon on Friday, March 26, 2021 will be included in a summary report that will be submitted to the District as part of the rezoning process.

The Public Hearing closed on 31 March 2021 and District Council may not receive new information following the close of the Public Hearing. Questions and comments can still be directed to BC Housing, RainCity Housing and District of North Vancouver staff during this time.

To find out more information about the proposal, please view a recording of the online information session held on February 23, below:


Your feedback and comments are important to us

We welcome questions and comments below in the Q&A tool or by email to communityrelations@bchousing.org.

Have a question or comment? Write below.

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  • To whom it concerns, Is the North Van Project “Raincity Housing” still happening? I was at the dial-in (wish I voiced my opinion) info session, I think most people in the immediate area are opposed that have children and with daycares in close proximity. New Lloyd rental suites did not have anyone living there or aware at the time, as valid vote. Might have made more sense to have a community meeting with residence living the closest to the proposed site (I am very close as well with a younger daughter). I hope this one gets shelved. Regards, CJ

    CJ604 asked about 1 month ago

    The project is still going ahead. These residents are just as diverse, and worthy of respect, as the people living in the rest of the community.  The women-led families who apply to live at 1577 Lloyd Ave would need to meet eligibility requirements around income, homelessness and required supports and programming.  

    All new residents would pay rent and sign a program agreement and good neighbour agreement. 

    Schools and daycares are in communities all over the province, just as homelessness is. These women-led households may, in fact, have children attending the local daycare or schools.

  • I have one Claint she is Persons with disabilities and she 55 years old Can we apply for one room?? Thank you

    Fedan asked 2 months ago

    BC Housing has a range of programs to provide housing assistance for residents of BC. This includes various subsidized housing options as well as rent supplements in which part of an individual's rent is paid for by BC Housing. You can view this site to search housing listings in a specific area including North Vancouver: https://www.bchousing.org/housing-assistance/rental-housing/housing-listings

    The Program Finder can be used to learn which programs you might be eligible for: https://programfinder.bchousing.org/programfinder/faces/start

    For more assistance with a housing application and to discuss potential housing options, please contact Applicant Services at 1-800-257-7756 (toll-free).

  • Great initiative!!! Proudly welcome the de dedevelopment in our neighborhood

    La asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your message supporting the permanent supportive housing project at West 16th Street and Lloyd Ave, North Vancouver.  We sincerely appreciate your positive note and encourage you to continue to follow this project here: https://letstalkhousingbc.ca/north-vancouver-west-16

  • These are badly needed homes! Please don't turn them down.

    saj asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your message supporting the permanent supportive housing project at West 16th Street and Lloyd Ave, North Vancouver.  We sincerely appreciate your positive note and encourage you to continue to follow this project here: https://letstalkhousingbc.ca/north-vancouver-west-16

  • Does the housing primarily benefit women with connections to the North shore?

    Keith asked 5 months ago

    This building is specifically targeted for single women and women-led families who are experiencing homelessness. Men are allowed to reside in the building, but women will be considered the head or lead tenant of each unit.

  • So, if the rate of homeless women/ families is at 27% (according to the news paper article linking to this site) why are we not focusing on a complex that has BOTH sexes supported. Since apparently men are the predominant homeless percentage on the shore? There are easy ways of designg it that has the two wing separate to lower any safety concerns from involved parties.

    Anon101 asked 6 months ago

    We recognize that there are a wide range of housing needs in North Vancouver. We continue to explore options to provide safe and secure housing for all people experiencing homelessness.

    The District of North Vancouver’s 2018 Rental and Affordable Housing Strategy identified that homelessness is on the rise in North Vancouver, and that women and children are increasingly vulnerable.

    This proposed supportive housing will address that growing need.

    It will provide a safe home for women and women led families who are experiencing homelessness to work towards a more healthy and stable life.

  • Is this approved? How do local residents vote for or against this? What is the timeline? I would like to register foe the zoom call - how do I do so?

    Sara Vosburgh asked 6 months ago

    This project is currently going through the rezoning process. You can contact the District of North Vancouver to voice your support or opposition to the project.

    District staff are leading the rezoning process. For more information on the rezoning process and timelines please visit http://DNV.org/west16th

    We hope you were able to join us for one of the Zoom sessions. If you have any specific questions please contact us at communityrelations@bchousing.org 

  • I've heard rumors that an InSite type facility is to be included in the plan. Is this true? Is there any reason to believe the rumors at all? I have a business within one block of the area, and I've driven through the DTES lately.

    Oldtimer asked 6 months ago

    This is not a safe injection site for the general public.

    We take a harm reduction approach. 

    This means staff is available to support any residents who are in various phases of substance use. 

    The building would be set up with the ability to provide a safe space for residents only, to ensure the safety of residents who are active substance users. 

    Harm reduction acknowledges that many people may not be in a position to remain abstinent. The harm reduction approach meets people where they are at and provides an option to engage with peers, medical and social services in a non-judgmental way. 

    The overarching goal of the harm reduction approach is to prevent the negative consequences of substance use and to improve health. Harm reduction approaches and programming are seen as a best practice for engaging with individuals with substance use issues.

    The operator would work with health providers in determining best practices to ensure tenants are safe and healthy. When residents are ready to make a change, staff on site would connect them with the appropriate support services.

  • Hi there. I’m a member of Norgate community and also have my business two blocks away from the lookout shelter. Nightly we are chasing junkies that are ripping our tow trucks off with many many phone calls to the rcmp. When you state that they can’t be evicted for dug and alcohol use that concerns me. Since when is it a good idea to mix children with drug and alcohol use in the same living complex? I feel like Norgate is going to take a huge hit for this and will feel the strain of people stealing in the community. I do not agree with the terms outlined in the article.

    Emily Hachie asked 6 months ago

    We understand your concerns about community safety and encourage you to continue to contact the RCMP if you witness illegal activity.

    People who experience homelessness are as varied as any other neighbour. They may be seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use.

    Labeling all people who experience homelessness as criminals or substance users stereotypes and marginalizes vulnerable people. 

    Supportive housing operates based on the widely recognized and proven Housing First model. 

    Residents in supportive housing buildings are permitted to make their own choices in regard to lifestyle. This includes the decision to abstain or use drugs/alcohol in the privacy of their homes.

    If they choose to use, the operators would work with each tenant ensure they use safely. 

    Harm reduction acknowledges that many people may not be in a position to remain abstinent. The harm reduction approach meets people where they are at and provides an option to engage with peers, medical and social services in a non-judgmental way. 

    The overarching goal of the harm reduction approach is to prevent the negative consequences of substance use and to improve health. Harm reduction approaches and programming are seen as a best practice for engaging with individuals with substance use issues.

    The operator would work with health providers in determining best practices to ensure tenants are safe and healthy. 

    When residents are ready to make a change, staff on site would connect them with the appropriate support services.

  • I am living in co-up right now in north Burnaby are and apply to transfer to north van. almost 3 years ago, can I apply for this building? and for registration what do i have to do?

    Rana asked 6 months ago

    We are still in the planning phase for this proposed project. We are not accepting applications for this building at this time. 

    BC Housing has a range of programs to provide housing assistance for residents of BC. This includes various subsidized housing options as well as rent supplements in which part of an individual's rent is paid for by BC Housing. You can view this site to search housing listings in a specific area: https://www.bchousing.org/housing-assistance/rental-housing/housing-listings

    The Program Finder can be used to learn which programs you might be eligible for: https://programfinder.bchousing.org/programfinder/faces/start     

    For more assistance with the housing application, please contact Applicant Services at 1-800-257-7756 (toll-free).

    If you have previously applied for housing through BC Housing’s Housing Registry, you must keep your application active.  

    People can request updates to their application status to ensure that it is active in BC’s Housing Registry. This must be done at least every 6 months or when information changes. If BC Housing does not hear from an applicant in over 6 months, the application is put on hold and the applicant may need to complete a new application. 

    To update an applicant status:  

    • By phone: Call the Housing Registry Inquiry Line at 604-433-2218, or 1-800-257-7756 outside the Lower Mainland. 
    • By fax: Fax a letter with your name, file number, previous information, and new information to The Housing Registry at 604-439-4729. 

    By mail: Mail a letter with your name, file number, previous information, and new information to The Housing Registry at:
    BC Housing Home Office
     101-4555 Kingsway, Burnaby, BC  V5H 4V8

    The demand for subsidized housing far exceeds the available supply and therefore, BC Housing places applicants based on the urgency of their housing need, and based on the priority list below:   

    • Applicants facing a severe risk to health and/or safety, such as currently being homeless or living in a homeless shelter. 
    • Applicants with serious health/medical/social needs, such as risk of homelessness, fleeing domestic abuse, living in severely inadequate housing, or transitioning to a more independent living situation. 
    • Applicants whose housing need is moderate compared with the two previous categories, such as living in temporary or inadequate accommodation. 
    • Applicants with a specialized housing need or low housing need, such as living in marginally crowded housing. 
    • Applicants for the low end market units found in some subsidized buildings. 

    Priority for public housing units managed by BC Housing is provided to people with the greatest need in a particular community at that given moment.