Vancouver Supportive Housing

Modular style supportive housing building in the city of Vancouver.

Photo is an example of a modular style supportive housing building located on Ash St. in Vancouver.

Hundreds of new supportive homes proposed for people in Vancouver

BC Housing and the City of Vancouver are taking collective action to address the critical needs of people who are at risk of or are experiencing homelessness in Vancouver by working together to build more than 350 new supportive homes.

Supportive Housing is a vital connection to programs and services

People who are at risk of or are experiencing homelessness are not all the same. They can be young people, seniors, people with disabilities, and anyone who has experienced trauma, poverty, or struggled with the high cost of housing. Each person requires a unique combination of services and programs to support their health and wellbeing.

When a person chooses to live in supportive housing, they:

  • have a warm, safe place to call home
  • can access the necessities of life such as food, washrooms, and laundry
  • can begin to heal from the damage caused by living outside
  • strengthen community connections

It takes a community to address homelessness

Homelessness is a complex challenge that is being addressed by governments, community groups and people working together.

In communities all across the city, people are taking action to welcome residents and support the success of supportive housing.

Here are some of the ways communities have welcomed their new neighbours:


Photo is an example of a modular style supportive housing building located on Ash St. in Vancouver.

Hundreds of new supportive homes proposed for people in Vancouver

BC Housing and the City of Vancouver are taking collective action to address the critical needs of people who are at risk of or are experiencing homelessness in Vancouver by working together to build more than 350 new supportive homes.

Supportive Housing is a vital connection to programs and services

People who are at risk of or are experiencing homelessness are not all the same. They can be young people, seniors, people with disabilities, and anyone who has experienced trauma, poverty, or struggled with the high cost of housing. Each person requires a unique combination of services and programs to support their health and wellbeing.

When a person chooses to live in supportive housing, they:

  • have a warm, safe place to call home
  • can access the necessities of life such as food, washrooms, and laundry
  • can begin to heal from the damage caused by living outside
  • strengthen community connections

It takes a community to address homelessness

Homelessness is a complex challenge that is being addressed by governments, community groups and people working together.

In communities all across the city, people are taking action to welcome residents and support the success of supportive housing.

Here are some of the ways communities have welcomed their new neighbours:


  • Renfrew St at E 14th Ave

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    BC Housing and the City of Vancouver are proposing to build a six-storey building with approximately 50 new homes with supports at 2930 Renfrew Street. The homes would be for adults, seniors, and people with disabilities who are experiencing, or are at risk of, homelessness with a priority for people in the local community.

  • East King Edward Avenue at Knight Street

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    Creating warm, safe homes with supports for people who are at risk or are experiencing homelessness in our communities continues to be a top priority for BC Housing and the City of Vancouver.

    The new building proposed at 1406 and 1410 E King Edward Ave would be 12 storeys and provide approximately 90 studio homes with supports for single adults, seniors and people with disabilities who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness in the local community.

  • West 8th Avenue at Arbutus Street

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    New warm, safe homes with supports on West 8th Avenue at Arbutus Street

    The new building proposed at 2086 and 2098 West 7th Avenue, 2091 West 8th Avenue would be 12 storeys and provide approximately 140 studio homes with supports for single adults, seniors and people with disabilities who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness in the local community.