Central Saanich - 1909 Prosser Road

Infographic featuring community integration of supportive housing


BC Housing is working with the Capital Regional District to build approximately 39 new permanent homes with support services for people who are marginalized and experiencing homelessness in Central Saanich.

With this design, priority will be given to people at risk of homelessness in the Central Saanich region who need minimal supports and are ready to move to living independently; many of these people have been living successfully in temporary shelters.

This development is part of an ongoing commitment to build housing solutions for those in need and is one of six new projects that will deliver more than 280 permanent supportive homes for people experiencing homelessness across the Capital region.

This District of Central Saanich - 1909 Prosser - Questions & Answers

The District of Central Saanich has shared community questions with BC Housing on the new supportive housing. This District of Central Saanich - 1909 Prosser - Questions & Answers has been developed to provide clarity and respond to those questions.

Housing with Supports

Supportive housing is a self-contained studio home with various support services provided on-site, to help people achieve and maintain housing stability. Supports could include:

  • outreach workers
  • life skills training
  • employment assistance
  • connection and referral to community services and support groups.

Staff would be on-site 24/7 working with each resident to understand their needs and goals.

Applicants will go through an assessment process to make sure there is a mix of residents with the right supports. All residents will have an individual case plan and pay rent.

Development Process

1909 Prosser was successfully rezoned in 2018 to designate the lands multi-family residential and included a Land Use Bylaw amendment to rezone the land from the A-1 Agriculture zone to a multi-family residential zone (RM-5).

Community Dialogue Sessions

BC Housing held a series of four community dialogues on April 26, 27 as well as two on May 4. These sessions provided the community with an opportunity to learn more about the new supportive housing and to ask questions about how the new housing will provide support for people in the community who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness. The presentation from these community dialogue sessions is available to download.

For privacy reasons these sessions were not recorded. However, our speakers recorded the below presentation to share the same information with those who could not attend the live events.

Your feedback and comments are important to us

We welcome questions and comments below in the Q&A tool or by email to communityrelations@bchousing.org


BC Housing is working with the Capital Regional District to build approximately 39 new permanent homes with support services for people who are marginalized and experiencing homelessness in Central Saanich.

With this design, priority will be given to people at risk of homelessness in the Central Saanich region who need minimal supports and are ready to move to living independently; many of these people have been living successfully in temporary shelters.

This development is part of an ongoing commitment to build housing solutions for those in need and is one of six new projects that will deliver more than 280 permanent supportive homes for people experiencing homelessness across the Capital region.

This District of Central Saanich - 1909 Prosser - Questions & Answers

The District of Central Saanich has shared community questions with BC Housing on the new supportive housing. This District of Central Saanich - 1909 Prosser - Questions & Answers has been developed to provide clarity and respond to those questions.

Housing with Supports

Supportive housing is a self-contained studio home with various support services provided on-site, to help people achieve and maintain housing stability. Supports could include:

  • outreach workers
  • life skills training
  • employment assistance
  • connection and referral to community services and support groups.

Staff would be on-site 24/7 working with each resident to understand their needs and goals.

Applicants will go through an assessment process to make sure there is a mix of residents with the right supports. All residents will have an individual case plan and pay rent.

Development Process

1909 Prosser was successfully rezoned in 2018 to designate the lands multi-family residential and included a Land Use Bylaw amendment to rezone the land from the A-1 Agriculture zone to a multi-family residential zone (RM-5).

Community Dialogue Sessions

BC Housing held a series of four community dialogues on April 26, 27 as well as two on May 4. These sessions provided the community with an opportunity to learn more about the new supportive housing and to ask questions about how the new housing will provide support for people in the community who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness. The presentation from these community dialogue sessions is available to download.

For privacy reasons these sessions were not recorded. However, our speakers recorded the below presentation to share the same information with those who could not attend the live events.

Your feedback and comments are important to us

We welcome questions and comments below in the Q&A tool or by email to communityrelations@bchousing.org

Questions or comments? Please add below.

Guidelines for constructive and respectful dialogue

  • Please ensure your question is clear, concise, relevant to the project, and respectful.
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  • The 2016 Saanich Peninsula Housing Assessment that you referenced in the community dialog session stated: Assessment: “Individuals experiencing homelessness were also identified as a group with the highest housing need. Although there is little to no data available on how many people are experiencing homelessness on the Saanich Peninsula, the anecdotal evidence gathered through the consultation suggests that the number of people experiencing homelessness is growing.”. It clearly states there has been no data available on how many people are experiencing homelessness on the Peninsula. Shouldn't data be gathered before a decision like this was made with NO community involvement or consultation? It seems like the community of Central Saanich is going to be inheriting issues from outside of our community, which is not right.

    Cameron asked about 2 months ago

    Hi Cameron

    These 39 new permanent homes with support services are for people who are marginalized and experiencing homelessness in Central Saanich—people who are already in the community. Building this housing will not ‘bring’ more people to the community—rather, it will house those who are homeless in the district.

    Sites for supportive housing are selected based on various criteria. BC Housing looks to acquire property based on community need and where there is an urgent need, as there is in Saanich. Housing for people experiencing homelessness needs to meet people where they are, providing connection to the resources that people need to work towards living a healthy, stable life.

    Our consultation with the community has been extensive: we sent letters to neighbours on March 24, 2021, letting them know about the project and sharing the Let’s Talk site. We then held four Community Dialogue sessions (April 26 & 27, and May 4), and also solicited applications from community members for the Community Advisory Council. 

    I hope this information is helpful. Please email is if you have additional questions at communityrelations@bchousing.org.

  • Why are you not updating this website? The last question on this site is May 4th,

    Brian asked 3 months ago

    The dates on the Q&As reflect the date the question was received, not the date it was answered.

    When we receive questions via the Let’s Talk form that have already been answered on the site, we respond directly to the individual and do not post duplicate information.

  • Will the the supportive housing project on Prosser rd have a dining room, commercial kitchen and common media room. Will it ressemble the Orca Place. Thank you

    Chantal asked 3 months ago

    The facility on Prosser Road will feature 39 studio apartments that will include a private kitchenette. There will also be one hot meal a day provided for residents. There will also be common areas for residents to enjoy together.

    You can read more about the facility in this Q&A document  and also the presentation from the Community Information Session. 

  • Why was rural Central Saanich chosen for this project? The main residential areas of Central Saanich, Brentwood Bay and Saanichton are SUBURBAN areas and have the appropriate services for the suburban/rural life style, stores, police fire etc. Why is BC Housing importing URBAN problems into our community? Most of us have chosen to live here because we don't want to live with URBAN problems. Central Saanich currently does not have the support systems for people with the challenges BC Housing wishes to bring into our community so why duplicate services that are available in the CRD core area? I have empathy for unfortunate souls with issues but my real concern is for the children of our community. Right now my grandchildren can run bare foot in Centennial Park only worrying about dog poop. BC Housing talks about litter which I guess means needles etc. Will BC Housing be posting signs to confirm needle sweeps have been done before soccer and ball games?

    BGC asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your email. As you will know there is an urgent need to house people experiencing homelessness in Victoria. Point-in-time homeless counts in 2020 found there are over 1,500 people experiencing homelessness in the city.  

    These 39 new permanent homes with support services are for people who are marginalized and experiencing homelessness in Central Saanich—people who are already in the community. As such, the population demographic isn’t changing. People are simply going to be housed, rather than homeless.

    Sites for supportive housing are selected based on various criteria. BC Housing looks to acquire property based on community need and where there is an urgent need for more housing. Housing for people experiencing homelessness needs to meet people where they are, providing connection to the resources that people need to work towards living a healthy, stable life.

    It takes a community to tackle complex issues like homelessness. A Community Advisory Committee will be established with representatives from Island Health, the non-profit housing operator, local businesses and schools, and community members at large, to proactively address any concerns regarding operations. 

    The non-profit operator will staff the residence 24/7 and will also be responsible for property maintenance and cleanliness - including regular sweeps for litter. Residents will also be expected to help maintain the property. A telephone number will be made available when the site is established. 

  • Hi, where will parking be? Will families (ie. parent and child) be eligible?

    Keely asked 3 months ago

    These 39 supportive homes will provide self-contained studio, 1-bedroom and 2-bedroom apartments with the necessary supports for people at risk of homelessness. 

    BC Housing will collaborate with local service providers on a thoughtful and thorough assessment process to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports move into the building on Prosser Road. Every potential resident will be considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services.

    We are still determining the design of the property, including parking. Estimated completion of this building is late 2021/ early 2022. 

  • What can we do to shut this project down? Is it protests? Door to door petitions? More online petitions? Could someone just tell us what we as a community need to do in order to move this homeless shelter somewhere else! We’ll do it, what’s it gunna take?

    Jacob asked 3 months ago

    This is not a homeless shelter. While shelter’s play an important role in communities, this property will see the development of 39 new purpose-built homes with supports. There are many differences. We have been working closely with the Capital Regional District on the plans for this property, and they have identified an urgent need for more homes with supports in this region. Priority will be given to people at risk of homelessness in the Central Saanich region who need minimal supports and are ready to move to living independently. Many of the people who will move into the Prosser residence have been living successfully in the temporary shelters and hotel rooms in the region.

    People experiencing homelessness are already a part of the community; they may be seniors, or people with disabilities, or people with employment but no housing. We want to help these people find safe and stable housing in the community and bring people inside from the streets.  

    To get a better sense of what supportive housing looks like, check out these videos of Orca Place and Camas Gardens

  • From the questions and answers I have seen. The Supportive housing will go to people already in Central Saanich. This is for the 39 units. How many "Qualified" Staff will be on duty 24/7? What is Qualified staff for people in these predicaments.? Who will be available for the other housing development? Will they also be provided with qualified staff? What are other proposed services for the clients? I don't remember getting a letter and only noticed when the trees came down. How does the building conform to local community standards and use of land? Was any provision given to artifacts found on the property?

    Jim asked 3 months ago

    BC Housing sent a letter to residents in the neighbourhood on March 24, 2021, to let them know BC Housing is working with the Capital Region District to build approximately 39 new homes for people at risk of homelessness at 1909 Prosser Road. The Let’s Talk site was also made live that day.

    1909 Prosser was successfully rezoned in 2018 to designate the lands multi-family residential and included a Land Use Bylaw amendment to rezone the land from the A-1 Agriculture zone to a multi-family residential zone (RM-5).

    People experiencing homelessness are already a part of the community; they may be seniors, or people with disabilities, or people with employment but no housing. We want to help these people find safe and stable housing in the community and bring people inside from the streets.  

    An operator for this site has not yet been chosen. However, BC Housing and our non-profit housing operators are committed to being good neighbours. Tenants will sign program agreements, and the building would have staff onsite 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to ensure that residents are supported and that any concerns are addressed in the timely manner. 

    Many of the people who will move into this residence have been living successfully in the temporary shelters and hotel rooms. There will be staff on-site 24 hours a day to provide important supports such as life skill training, wellness checks and other health and skill development programs. Applicants will go through an assessment process to make sure there is a mix of residents with the right supports. Every potential resident is considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services. 

    Meetings held by BC Housing’s coordinated access table (including Outreach services, Housing, Central Saanich Police Service, and Island Health) assess applicants for suitability. Suitability considers vulnerability in the community, neighbourhood considerations, accessibility to services, the housing operators’ experience and mandates—all in the interest of creating a balanced mix tenancy that will support successful operation and tenancies.   

    BC Housing’s supportive housing buildings are operated based on the widely recognized and proven Housing First model. 

    The housing operator will ensure that all staff have the appropriate training and skills necessary to support the clients. The required training, as required by BC Housing, includes, but is not limited to crisis prevention training; first Aid/CPR; mental health first aid training; domestic violence and safety planning; substance use awareness and safety training; and trauma-informed training.

    The operator staff will be supported by health professionals (e.g. nurses, counsellors and outreach workers) from Island Health who will conduct regular visits. 

    The supportive housing model is unique in that all residents in supportive housing have made a choice to live there and are able to access the services provided by non-profit housing operators, such as life-skills training, and connections to primary health care, mental health and/or harm reduction services, and employment and life-skills programming. 

    Additional supports are also available, such as daily meals, outreach workers, wellness checks, life and employment skills training, opportunities for volunteer work, connection and referral to community services and support groups. 

  • I am very concerned for the new residents who will be coming to live at the Prosser Ave supportive housing location. As a resident of Central Saanich, I can understand the concerns and worries of my neighbors as we see/hear about the terrible situation unfolding in Victoria. We don't want that situation here. I am frustrated that communication between BC Housing, our local council and our community has been so poor regarding the new supportive housing initiative. The new Prosser Ave residents, already facing life challenges and stigmatization, will be further stigmatized, and deeply distrusted by the community because it has been handled so poorly. With only 12 months to go, BC Housing and local council need to organize many additional community meetings to discuss who will be living at the location, supports in place to help them adjust, grow and thrive, and how this housing opportunity will positively impact their futures. These new residents deserve to live in dignity, without fear for their safety and wellbeing and to have the opportunity to become a valued contributing member of our community. It needs to be explained that permanent and safe housing is (one of) the most important factors that allows people to thrive and be a positive contributing member of society.

    Teresa asked 3 months ago

    Hi Teresa

    Thank you for your message. We agree that understanding the supportive housing model is an important part of helping the community welcome their neighbours. 

    The supportive housing model is unique in that all residents in supportive housing have made a choice to live there and are able to access the services provided by non-profit housing operators, such as life-skills training, and connections to primary health care, mental health and/or harm reduction services, and employment and life-skills programming. 

    Additional supports are also available, such as daily meals, outreach workers, wellness checks, life and employment skills training, opportunities for volunteer work, connection and referral to community services and support groups. 

    The operator will be able to assist residents who require medical assistance, either through on-site supports or off-site appointments. We are working with Island Health to ensure appropriate health services for residents. 

    BC Housing will collaborate with local service providers on a thoughtful and thorough assessment process to ensure an appropriate mix of residents with the right supports move into the building on Prosser Road. Every potential resident will be considered on an individual basis to ensure that the housing and services provided by the program match the support services that they need, such as life skills training, employment assistance, and help with accessing a range of social and health care services.

    Offers of housing are made following meetings held by BC Housing’s coordinated access table where agencies including Outreach, Housing, Central Saanich Police Service, and Island Health assess applicants for suitability. Suitability considers vulnerability in the community, neighbourhood considerations, accessibility to services, the housing operators’ experience and mandates - all in the interest of creating a balanced mix tenancy that will support successful operation and tenancies.  

    To help integrate the facility into the neighbourhood, a Community Advisory Committee (CAC) will be established with representation from the non-profit operator, BC Housing, Island Health, RCMP, local government, businesses and other community members at large who will work together to address any concerns and to support positive integration into the community. 

    Teresa, we hope this information is helpful. Please email us if you have additional questions. 

  • For the past 42 years I have worked at a non homeless hotel on Gorge Rd and I've never seen such a mess, that the Victoria counsel has created. This is the absolutely the wrong type of housing for people who are not capable of making good decision. They are dangerous to others and themselves. I agree we are sadly lacking in the proper care and facilities for mental illness and drug addiction. The reason they are homeless is because of underlying issues. Supported housing is not used for the average person who is down on there luck and needs a cheaper place to live. I have lived in Saanichton for 30 years and I would think long and hard about who is placed here. Believe me I've seen it first hand it can totally ruin a community.

    Leea asked 3 months ago

    What is being proposed at 1909 Prosser is not the same as shelters or leased hotels that were established to respond to an emergency housing situation. 

    These will be permanent homes with supports. Supportive housing is a self-contained studio home with various support services provided on-site, to help people achieve and maintain housing stability. Staff would be on-site 24/7 working with each resident to understand their needs and goals. Applicants will go through an assessment process to make sure there is a mix of residents with the right supports. All residents will have an individual case plan and pay rent.

    The supportive housing model is unique in that all residents in supportive housing have made a choice to live there and are able to access the services provided by non-profit housing operators, such as life-skills training, and connections to primary health care, mental health and/or harm reduction services, and employment and life-skills programming. 

    Additional supports are also available, such as daily meals, outreach workers, wellness checks, life and employment skills training, opportunities for volunteer work, connection and referral to community services and support groups. 

    The operator will be able to assist residents who require medical assistance, either through on-site supports or off-site appointments. We are working with Island Health to ensure appropriate health services for residents. 

    It’s important to note that not everyone who lives here will use alcohol or drugs, nor do they all require support for substance use. They are vulnerable members of the community - they might be seniors, people with employment but are unable to afford housing, or people with disabilities. 

  • I am unable to attend the session this evening, but I have a couple questions. BC Housing has identified setting up a community advisory committee at development outset as a strategy for building positive relationships. Was that done for the Prosser Rd. initiative? If not, could that still be set up?

    Jeri Covay asked 3 months ago

    Hi Jeri

    Yes, we will be setting up Community Advisory Council for the Prosser Road property.

    Individuals interested in joining a CAC should email communityrelations@bchousing.org