Vancouver - Howard Johnson Hotel, 1176 Granville St.

Picture of Howard Johnson hotel on Granville St.


The Province, through BC Housing, has purchased the 110-room Howard Johnson Hotel at 1176 Granville St. as part of a long-term plan to build a mix of affordable homes for people in Vancouver.

In the interim, the Howard Johnson site will operate as temporary supportive housing while long-term plans are developed. BC Housing will be launching an online engagement initiative on July 8th to invite the community to learn more and address questions that neighbours may have about supportive housing being operated at the site.

Atira Womens Resource Society will operate the housing at the hotel, which includes wraparound supports where people have access to services such as meals, health care, addictions treatment and harm reduction, as well as storage for personal belongings. The site also have 24/7 staffing to provide security to residents of the building and the surrounding neighbourhood.

Image: Attributed to Google Maps



The Province, through BC Housing, has purchased the 110-room Howard Johnson Hotel at 1176 Granville St. as part of a long-term plan to build a mix of affordable homes for people in Vancouver.

In the interim, the Howard Johnson site will operate as temporary supportive housing while long-term plans are developed. BC Housing will be launching an online engagement initiative on July 8th to invite the community to learn more and address questions that neighbours may have about supportive housing being operated at the site.

Atira Womens Resource Society will operate the housing at the hotel, which includes wraparound supports where people have access to services such as meals, health care, addictions treatment and harm reduction, as well as storage for personal belongings. The site also have 24/7 staffing to provide security to residents of the building and the surrounding neighbourhood.

Image: Attributed to Google Maps


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  • Why is the safety of drug addicts more important than the safety of children and residents overall in the neighborhood. If you house drug addicts and criminals (yes, that's the truth also) in this hotel you can expect them to leave the hotel and wander around the streets and especially Emery Barnes Park. I just don't understand why you would feel that bringing even more problematic people to the Granville Street area was a good idea. That street has issues as it is and now you made it even worse. Creating a new ghetto surely isn't the solution. I am honestly sick and tired of seeing needles and drug addicts sitting a few meters away from the playground. I highly recommend watching the Komo4 News documentary "Seattle is dying". They highlight the handling of a similar crisis in Rhode Island as the way out where enforcement of laws and intervention at jails had a 93% success rate. They enforce existing laws and do send people to jails but this is where the difference lies. There is all the support (doctors, pharmacists, social workers, drug addictdion specialists etc) available in these special jails. People leave after their sentence and come back to get their treatment and become productive members of society. Your main concern should be for the safety of the tax paying families in the neighborhood. Drug addicts should be housed away from areas where they can do harm to others. I highly recommend a walk through Emery BArnes Park , alleys etc.

    Tom Asked 28 days ago

    BC Housing and our partners are committed to working together to build a diverse, inclusive community and being good neighbours. 

    Homelessness continues to be a significant issue in neighbourhoods across the city and throughout the region and province. While the solution to homelessness is housing with appropriate supports, there is not enough of this housing to meet the need; therefore, there are also a number of programs and initiatives to support communities while housing solutions are still being developed, including increased street cleaning, homelessness outreach, and harm reduction services.

    It is important to realize that without housing, individuals would remain on the streets with deteriorating health. Our programs and services aim to break the cycle of homelessness. Our goal is to provide supportive housing that is an attribute to the community; we support individuals in their journey to a healthier life by giving people stable housing and access to supports.

    People experiencing homelessness are not one homogenous group. These are members of our community that to be treated with deserve dignity and respect. They are seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. Many people who are experiencing homelessness have been living in isolation or have lost their connection to community. One of the goals of supportive housing is to help residents engage with their surrounding community and build a sense of belonging. All residents in supportive housing have made a choice to work towards a healthier future.

    BC Housing follows the widely recognized and proven Housing First model, which aims to end chronic homelessness by first providing stable housing, and then working with the resident to promote recovery and well being. In order to help people who may be struggling with substance use, we need to first give them a safe and secure place to sleep, food to eat, and access to services so that they can move forward with their lives. We meet people where they are at in their journey, and support them towards healthier futures. We believe everyone deserves secure housing. 

    The supportive housing is operated by Atira – a local housing and homelessness services provider with significant experience working with vulnerable populations. Each site has wraparound supports where people have access to services such as meals, health care, addictions treatment and harm reduction. All residents receive individualized case planning to further develop life and social skills such as employment planning and managing the transition to independence and recovery. Supports are matched to meet the needs of each tenant to ensure that they are can maintain a stable tenancy. Residents are connected to the supports offered by Vancouver Coastal Health and referrals and connections to service providers. 

  • You mentioned in the long-term it will be a mix of affordable housing. Can you elaborate and provide more details regarding what that means, who will be the targeted tenants? I agree that there are people need help, but how do we ensure that only those people that truly demand help get the support (if they are not willing to adapt to the change, has no eagerness to change their situation, and they even not want the support, then I assume we should probably not dictate the way how they live?) I think we need to be some sort of "selective" (not saying we should not be inclusive) from a long-term perspective, and provide support to those actually demanding the support, willing to change themselves/adapt to the new lifestyle and really being part of the community, and contribute to the community positively. Also, HJ hotel is located probably within 100 - 200m of the Emery Barns Park which is lots of kids' playground. Having people that has addiction issues/mental illness surrounding this area is a real concern for children's health and safety (both mentally and physically), and how will you address the issue going forward from a long-term perspective? In addition, what procedures BC Housing will take to ensure there is minimal disturbances to the local community going forward (as it is apparent that the disturbance is quite significant now, and we are not seeing it is trending to the better side if it is not getting worse)?

    Brava Tower Resident Asked 26 days ago

    The former Howard Johnson Hotel at 1176 Granville Street was purchased to provide housing in the areas of Vancouver where it is urgently needed. The property and the adjacent parking lot also present an opportunity to redevelop the sites and build a mix of affordable homes for people in Vancouver. The site will provide temporary supportive housing while BC Housing engages with the community and the City to explore opportunities to build a mix of affordable homes. BC Housing will be looking into redevelopment options but doesn’t have a timeline in place yet. 

    It is important to recognize that people who experience homelessness are as varied as any other neighbour. They are seniors, people with disabilities, people who have employment but no housing, people who are working through mental health concerns and/or substance use. All residents in supportive housing have made a choice to work towards a healthier future. BC Housing follows the widely recognized and proven Housing First model, which aims to end chronic homelessness by first providing stable housing, and then working with the resident to promote recovery and well being. In order to help people who may be struggling with substance use, we need to first give them a safe and secure place to sleep, food to eat, and access to services so that they can move forward with their lives. BC Housing is committed to creating a safe environment for everyone in the community, including residents living in our buildings. We meet people where they are at in their journey, and support them towards healthier futures. We believe everyone deserves secure housing,

    BC Housing’s goal is to provide programs and services for residents that seek to break the cycle of homelessness. The housing includes wraparound supports where people have access to services such as meals, health care, addictions treatment and harm reduction. People who had been living on the streets and in the parks are now able to sleep in a safe place, have their own bathrooms, and access the supports they need. The building is staffed 24/7 to make sure residents receive the vital health and social services they need in a safe and secure environment.

    We are working with Atira to ensure there is a mix of people in the building to build a healthy community and make sure people have the support they need.All residents receive individualized case planning to further develop life and social skills such as employment planning and managing the transition to independence and recovery, as well as programming space to facilitate training and food preparation. Additional support services include wellness checks and connection and referral to community services and support groups. 

    BC Housing, Atira, the City of Vancouver, Vancouver Coastal Health and the Vancouver Police Department are all working in coordination to support a safe and inclusive community for the new residents of the Buchan and the surrounding neighbourhood.

    All residents sign agreements regarding appropriate and respectful behaviour as it relates to health and safety of themselves, other tenants and neighbours, and are expected to abide by it. Guests are permitted, as with any other rental housing, and residents are responsible for them. Staff work with residents and the neighbours to foster good neighbourhood relations.  Residents are expected to:

    ·         Treat neighbours and community with consideration;

    ·         Not make excessive noise or cause unnecessary disturbances;

    ·         Ensure security doors are closed properly and not let any unknown persons into building;

    ·         Put garbage in the appropriate bins;

    ·         Clean up after pets;

    ·         Smoke in the designated areas

    The housing operator may end an agreement at any time if a resident is:

    ·         Engaging or behaving in a manner which is abusive and/or a threat to the mental or physical health or safety of anyone in the building/community;

    ·         Significantly disrupting the quiet enjoyment of other participants and/or neighbours; and

    ·         Engaging in willful vandalism or damage to the building or property.

    BC Housing is setting up a new Community Dialogue group that will oversee the supportive housing’s integration within the community. The Community Dialogue Group will bring together service providers, experienced not-for-profit providers, business and community representatives to communicate how the hotels are operating, how they will be managed, and receive feedback from the community. This dialogue group isa key part of how we will ensure that this project integrates well into the neighbourhood, and our experience is that these types of groups have been very effective at helping communities work together to address concerns and endure a positive connection with neighbours.

  • You mentioned the location was chosen since it is close to Three Bridges. The Three Bridges clinic already becomes a nightly homeless camp and is disruptive to the buildings in the area. Can we expect this to get even worse than it already is? Will they do anything to stop this from happening (e.g. install a gate)? We've also noticed a major uptick in visible homelessness and open drug use in alleyways since the police are patrolling the streets. There is a definite fear for safety when using back exits. Will they begin patrolling these areas as well? Thank you.

    Name Asked about 1 month ago

    BC Housing purchased the Howard Johnson to provide housing in an area of Vancouver where it’s urgently needed. It’s important that supportive housing be located close to services that people count on, such as health care and grocery stores. Its proximity to the Three Bridges clinic is one of numerous reason this site is well situated for supportive housing. Because of this central location, the site is also ideal for affordable housing for people from seniors to young families and there are future plans to redevelop the property and the adjacent parking lot to provide a mix of affordable housing.


    Homelessness has been more visible for the past few months as physical distancing requirements during the COVID-19 pandemic led to closures of many public facilities which people without homes rely on, such as community centres, public washrooms, libraries, and drop-in centres. Some people who were staying with friends and family may also no longer have access to those spaces because of physical distancing concerns. As a result, people are more visible on the street as they do not have safe spaces to go indoors. As the province continues to move into Phase 3 of its Restart Plan, we anticipate many community spaces will begin to reopen.


    We recognize that homelessness continues to be a significant issue in neighbourhoods across the city and throughout the region and province. The solution to homelessness is housing with appropriate supports, such as what has been put in place at the former Howard Johnson, where residents now have a safe place to sleep, have the dignity of their own bathrooms, and can access the supports they need. The Province, through BC Housing, is investing in more of these urgently needed homes in order to provide people with safe, supportive places to go and help them move off the streets. As this work continues, there are also a number of programs and initiatives underway to support communities, including homelessness outreach and harm reduction services, which are the most effective ways to reduce visible drug use and help people access health and mental health supports. The police are engaged where appropriate and Vancouver Police say they have increased patrols and the City has also increased street cleaning services.


    BC Housing, the Vancouver Police Department, the City of Vancouver, Vancouver Coastal Health and Atira are all working in coordination to support a safe and inclusive community for the new residents and the surrounding neighbourhood.